Open side-bar Menu
 3DEXPERIENCE Construction
Akio Moriwaki
Akio Moriwaki
As head of global marketing for the AEC Industry at Dassault Systèmes, Mr. Moriwaki launches and promotes groundbreaking Industry Solution Experiences including "Optimized Construction," "Façade Design for Fabrication," and "Civil Design for Fabrication." He is a member of buildingSMART.

It’s Time to Provide More Than Design Intent for Architectural Projects

 
December 8th, 2016 by Akio Moriwaki

No car manufacturer in business would create an engine bay by interpreting a representative 2D drawing—yet it is still acceptable for AEC professionals to work that way.

click-to-tweetClick to Tweet: No car manufacturer would build from
a representative 2D drawing. Why should #AEC?

Today’s complex buildings should no longer rely on fragmented communication through 2D drawings or pdfs, said Robert Beson of AR-MA (Architectural Research – Material Applications Pty Ltd.), in a recent presentation at the 3DEXPERIENCE Forum Asia Pacific South 2016.

Beson suggested that architects today have a responsibility to provide more than just design intent. When relying on 2D drawings, too much is left up to interpretation.

click-to-tweetClick to Tweet: Architects have a responsibility
to provide more than just design intent

“It’s necessary to fully engage with the methods of construction, of manufacturing, assembly, logistics and installation,” Beson says. “We need to understand and engage our supply chain from concept through design.”

Adapting to New Processes

Moving to a collaborative platform based on parts and assemblies makes sense, but requires new skillsets from designers.

Today, every project AR-MA designs is comprehensively modeled in 3D.

Every project uses 3D laser point cloud scanning to verify work as it’s built onsite.

Every project uses 3D laser point cloud scanning to verify work as it’s built onsite.

The shift requires architects to interact in new ways with fabrication and construction professionals.

click-to-tweetClick to Tweet: Architects must interact in new
ways with fabrication & construction pros

Take connection brackets, for example. By combining 3D scanning and a just-in-time fabrication pipeline, it’s no longer necessary to design complicated 3-way adjustable brackets. The team can design simple laser cut plates, each of which are slightly different and ultimately improve the tolerances onsite.

The need for 2D drawings can be fully removed by laser cutting or engraving directions for assembly into the materials themselves.

To provide these fabrication-ready solutions, every member of the team at AR-MA writes code.

Every AR-MA team member writes code in order to directly send information to fabrication machinery.

Every AR-MA team member writes code in order to directly send information to fabrication machinery.

“It’s not enough just to model, and put together assemblies and parts, and think through the building process,” Beson says. “It’s crucial to engage with the means of production and be able to communicate with them. Often that means writing code and sending G-codes directly to the CNC machines.”

Comprehensive Modeling for Wynyard Walk’s Unique Components

For Wynyard Walk, a pedestrian walkway recently completed in Sydney, AR-MA was contracted to manage and execute detail design of the stainless cladding. The team had to deliver a fabrication-ready package of over 3,000 perforated stainless panels and lights, more than 50% of which were entirely unique.

Beson notes that it would not have been possible to work from 2D drawings of the mostly unique 3,000 perforated stainless steel panels at the Wynyard Walk pedestrian walkway.

Beson notes that it would not have been possible to work from 2D drawings of the mostly unique 3,000 perforated stainless steel panels at the Wynyard Walk pedestrian walkway.

The designers wanted a parametric model that was flexible enough to respond to ongoing design challenges.

The model had to accommodate an as-built primary structure, a glass reinforced concrete wall cladding, interfaces with the ceiling, and ongoing changes in the panel layout and perforations due to modifications in the façade mullions and setouts.

The contractor found the Façade Design for Fabrication powered by 3DEXPERIENCE platform best fit its needs.

Its integration of design and engineering, part and assembly paradigm, and scalability, among other features, allowed the team to produce a highly detailed and accurate 3D model of the entire project scope.

The integration of design, engineering and fabrication information made the 3DEXPERIENCE a strong solution for this project.

The integration of design, engineering and fabrication information made the 3DEXPERIENCE a strong solution for this project.

Not only did the comprehensive model prevent problems before they arose, but it allowed designers to minimize the number of part drawings by providing fabrication-ready geometry that was sent directly to the fabricator.

This saved time in the office and factory, and removed any error from misinterpretation of the 2D drawings.

For example, the tremendous time crunch made it necessary to release all fabrication information in batches. Façade Design for Fabrication helped the team to coordinate and track those batch releases, as well as any revisions.

Technical Support of Creativity

Beson pointed out that architecture has long been considered a creative endeavor, but what unifies the team at AR-MA is a belief that architects must unite creativity with technical ability.

“Both are necessary to produce the types of innovative and formative buildings our cities require today,” he says.

click-to-tweetClick to Tweet: “It’s Time to Provide More Than
Design Intent for Architectural Projects”

Related Resources

Intelligent 3D Façade Templated Design

 
December 1st, 2016 by Akio Moriwaki

By Geoff Haines

Geoffrey M. Haines, BSc(Eng), ACGI, C Eng, MIMechE, FRSA

Geoffrey M. Haines, BSc(Eng), ACGI, C Eng, MIMechE, FRSA

If you think back to your first days in a design office, in a new industry, fresh from college, you’ll remember that there was always a designer who’d been there many years. That was the person you sought for help, as they had all the experience of what works and what doesn’t.

It was Oscar Wilde who said, “Experience is simply the name we give to our mistakes.” Why shouldn’t you capture that experience to then avoid making the same mistakes?

There is a way this can be achieved which is by using a templated approach to design or, to use another term, “Knowledge Based Engineering”.

click-to-tweetClick to Tweet: Knowledge Based Engineering
= taking a templated approach to design

Knowledge Based Engineering sounds like a complicated process but our simple application and approach allows an organisation to capture best practises and methodologies which become an automatic benefit for all concerned.

It is a way to create fully detailed designs and manufacturing information automatically.

Further, designers can then optimise, or “optioneer”, many different ideas or solutions quickly to enhance the design process.

click-to-tweetClick to Tweet: With templates #AEC designers
“optioneer” many different solutions quickly

3D_Facade_-294x300At Desktop Engineering we have taken this idea and developed what we term an Intelligent Rainscreen Panel for façade designers and fabricators.

Using Dassault’s 3DEXPERIENCE Platform, we have captured the rules and formulae that drive the shape, strength, weight, and cost of a panel.

Factors such as blank sheet utilisation, different materials and thicknesses, and knowledge of manufacturing costs (laser cutting, folding) are all accounted for in the rules.

Further, the secondary structure or rails, that hold the panels have also been created as intelligent parts with similar information.

Combine these intelligent templates with an automated process for replicating them on a 3D building model and, within minutes, users are able to create a full design with manufacturing drawings, material schedules, and costs.

Alternate designs can be recreated by simply varying one or several parameters and then seeing the resultant recalculated cost and design.

Of course there is no single set of “knowledge” or “experiences”, as then there would be no differentiation between competing façade fabricators.

However, with the basis of one set of Knowledge within our Intelligent Rainscreen Panel, we are able to customise this set to suit particular fabricators.

click-to-tweetClick to Tweet: Intelligent #3D
Façade Templated Design


Originally published on the Desktop Engineering Blog.


Related Resources

WHITEPAPER: END-TO-END COLLABORATION ENABLED BY BIM LEVEL 3: An Industry Approach Based on Best Practices from Manufacturing

Facade Design for Fabrication Industry Process Experience

Desktop Engineering

Leveraging “Design For Manufacturing” for More Sustainable Buildings

 
November 17th, 2016 by Patrick Mays, AIA

This blog is adapted from an AIA presentation on Technology and Practice presented in partnership with the UNC Charlotte College of Architecture in October 2016.

click-to-tweetClick to Tweet: Leveraging “Design For Manufacturing”
for More #Sustainable Buildings

construction

Design for Manufacturing is a process whereby designers consider the impact of manufacturing processes in the way they design buildings.

Large components—whether large concrete panels or whole modular rooms for an apartment building—might be completed within a factory environment and delivered to a jobsite where they are connected to MEP systems.

To be successful in this approach, designers must work with building component manufacturers to understand their capabilities and design a construction approach that accounts for the logistics of getting modules to the jobsite and installed.

By considering how to optimize factory processes and then most efficiently assembling the modular elements in the field, designers can leverage strategies that greatly eliminate construction waste.

With reduced waste, building owners can adjust their budgets and apply significant savings from improved processes to better materials and overall more sustainable buildings.

The Two Paths to Reducing Construction Costs

click-to-tweetClick to Tweet: The 2 Paths to
Reducing Construction Costs

Construction projects typically see amounts of waste near 30% due to redundant rework and inefficiency.

Without this waste, building owners could achieve significant project savings and reinvest in higher quality materials that are less harmful to the environment.

There are two potential approaches to reducing costs in construction:

  1. AEC professionals can continually look for cheaper materials and labor to control construction costs. For example, vinyl is a very popular building material, largely because it is inexpensive compared to wood and other solutions. Yet PVC is made from chlorine salt using lots of electricity in a very environmentally unfriendly process.
  2. Alternatively, AEC professionals can change their processes. By adopting a Design for Manufacturing approach, fabricators can automate many of the repetitive tasks that have to be done to produce a building. Fewer, albeit more highly skilled, workers can manage building component production in a safe, factory environment.

The latter approach may require a greater upfront investment, but the return on that investment can be recouped through the dramatic reductions in waste. Those savings can, in turn, be applied to investment in more sustainable building solutions.
Read the rest of Leveraging “Design For Manufacturing” for More Sustainable Buildings

Focusing on Process Over Product: A New Approach to Construction Productivity

 
November 13th, 2016 by Patrick Mays, AIA

This blog is adapted from an AIA presentation on Technology and Practice presented in partnership with the UNC Charlotte College of Architecture in October 2016.

click-to-tweetClick to Tweet: “Focusing on Process Over Product
for Construction Productivity”

Research indicates that construction is one of the only industries where efficiency and productivity has actually fallen over the past 50 to 60 years. While processes exist to optimize construction, one of the biggest challenges in overcoming this inefficiency is the fact that few AEC companies see their own inefficiency.
Read the rest of Focusing on Process Over Product: A New Approach to Construction Productivity

Making Cities Bigger and Better

 
November 4th, 2016 by Akio Moriwaki

By Catherine Bolgar

click-to-tweetClick to Tweet: Making Cities Bigger &
Better #civildesign @3DSAEC @aeccafe

iStock_95030039_SMALL-768x499 By 2050, two-thirds of the world’s population will live in cities, the United Nations Human Settlements Program forecasts.

Meanwhile cities themselves are growing, with the number of megacities—those with populations greater than 10 million—expected to hit 41 by 2030, up from 28 today and just 10 in 1990.

The challenge is how to make sprawling, dense cities livable, sustainable and efficient for residents. But priorities for livability aren’t easy to define.

“If you have an older population, then things they see as priorities may be different than in a city with a huge number of young people,” says Stephen Hammer, manager of climate policy for the World Bank Group in Washington, DC.

Read the rest of Making Cities Bigger and Better

A Treasure Trove of AEC Insights and Discoveries

 
October 27th, 2016 by Akio Moriwaki

if we

To create truly innovative structures, today’s AEC professionals must look first at their creation process. Pushing the boundaries requires new technologies, new strategies and a new mindset.

The truly innovative AEC professionals are looking beyond what’s been done, to what’s being done across other industries.

Here you’ll gain insight from experts on the cutting edge of the industrialization of design and construction. Discover how to apply the efficiency of industrialized manufacturing strategies to any project, and the significant advantages this approach can yield.

If we look beyond traditional AEC methods, we can transform the efficiency with which projects are delivered and operated.
Read the rest of A Treasure Trove of AEC Insights and Discoveries

Simulation Helps Save the World’s Architectural Heritage

 
October 20th, 2016 by Kristina Hines

UNIVERSITY HASSAN FIRST

click-to-tweetClick to Tweet: Simulation Helps Save the World’s
#Architectural Heritage | @Uni_hassan1 @3DS_SIMULIA

The urge to become an engineer hits many people early on in life. Dr. Hicham Fihri-Fassi first felt the call as a young high school student. “I’ve always liked to innovate, and engineering enabled me to do just that,” he says.
Read the rest of Simulation Helps Save the World’s Architectural Heritage

The Underestimated Role of Simulation in Architecture, Engineering and Construction

 
October 6th, 2016 by Deepak Datye

click-to-tweetClick to Tweet: The Underestimated
Role of Simulation in #AEC

Have you heard of hyper-loops, undersea hotels, and made-to-order 3D-printed buildings? These were just concepts a few years ago, but are reality now.

architecture-simulation-1-768x493

These structures need to be designed for either transporting people through natural surroundings, protecting them from natural surroundings, or allowing them to interact with natural surroundings.

The commonalities that underlay these structures consist of intricate linkages between product, nature, and life.

In fact, the original charter of the Institution of Civil Engineers describes the civil engineering profession as “the art of directing the great sources of power in nature for the use and convenience of man”, and herein underlies the role of product, nature and life.
Read the rest of The Underestimated Role of Simulation in Architecture, Engineering and Construction

Applauding XtreeE in leading 3D printing revolution

 
September 29th, 2016 by Akio Moriwaki

click-to-tweetClick to Tweet: Applauding @XtreeE in
leading a #3dprinting revolution in #AEC

Even as digital technology is transforming AEC processes, emerging digital platforms stand poised to transform construction products themselves.

Paris-based XtreeE is seeking to lead an industrial revolution in construction, civil and mechanical engineering by using 3D printing for large-scale architectural applications.

Through integrated consulting, manufacturing and technology, XtreeE provides education on how to use additive construction in the construction industry, while also developing end-user solutions and the technology needed to fabricate products.

Watch this 360-degree video to experience the process of designing and 3D printing a concrete structure:

(Tip: Use the directional controls to pan around the room as the video plays.)
Read the rest of Applauding XtreeE in leading 3D printing revolution

How Human Task Simulation Can Identify AEC Safety Risks

 
September 22nd, 2016 by Prashanth Mysore

click-to-tweetClick to Tweet: How Human Task Simulation
Can Identify #AEC Safety Risks

human task simulation

Injury from musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs)—caused by lifting heavy items, performing tasks repetitively, working in awkward body postures, etc.—plagues many industries. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that in 2013, 33 percent of all worker injury and illness cases were the result of MSDs.
Read the rest of How Human Task Simulation Can Identify AEC Safety Risks

GRAPHISOFT: ARCHICAD download 30-day FREE trial
Graphisoft ARCHICAD  Download a 30-Day FREE trial
TurboCAD pro : Start at $299
CADalog.com - Countless CAD add-ons, plug-ins and more.



Internet Business Systems © 2016 Internet Business Systems, Inc.
595 Millich Dr., Suite 216, Campbell, CA 95008
+1 (408)-337-6870 — Contact Us, or visit our other sites:
TechJobsCafe - Technical Jobs and Resumes EDACafe - Electronic Design Automation GISCafe - Geographical Information Services  MCADCafe - Mechanical Design and Engineering ShareCG - Share Computer Graphic (CG) Animation, 3D Art and 3D Models
  Privacy Policy