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Archive for the ‘Dassault Systèmes’ Category

SIMULATION FOR BRIDGES

Thursday, December 28th, 2017

The following article is excerpted from SIMULATION IN ARCHITECTURE, ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION. To read more, download the full white paper here.

Starting with a Dassault Systemes’ CATIA® model, one can use physics apps on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform to create simulation models and perform analyses for events such as the movement of trains on bridge decks. One such example is shown below in Figure 1. Two balanced cantilever spans of a representative box-girder bridge are meshed, and finite element analysis is performed. A standard TGV train is considered to pass over the spans, and appropriate axle loads are taken into account at the wheel locations. The wheels are considered to be point masses, and vertical loads are generated at the point mass locations due to the action of gravity. Contact conditions are specified between the point masses and the bridge deck, and the set of point masses is then translated longitudinally over the bridge deck in order to simulate the passing of the train.

Figure 1 shows the contours of the component of tensile stress along the bridge’s longitudinal direction as generated by the train’s live load. One can see high tensile stresses along the deck top surface in the neighborhood of the pier as the train’s weight is borne by the cantilever portion of the bridge deck. Although just elastic properties have been used for the bridge deck in this analysis, other material models appropriate for concrete will need to be used along with reinforcements and pre-stressing cables to get more realistic results. The latter will be essential when responses of the
bridge to scenarios such as seismic and extreme loading need to be predicted.

 

Figure 1. Bridge showing contours of tensile stress along the axis. The tensile stress gets generated due to live load from the train.

 

Figure 2 shows a picture of the 8-lane, 1,907 feet long steel truss arch bridge over the Mississippi River on I-35 in Minneapolis, Minnesota USA that collapsed on August 1, 2007. National Transportation Safety Board and other agencies thoroughly investigated this collapse, and detailed finite element analyses were performed.

Figure 2. Picture of the truss-arch bridge over the Mississippi river that collapsed in 2007. Image courtesy: National Transportation Safety Board.

 

Figure 3 shows a close-up view of a section of the bridge where the collapse initiated. Detailed analysis of the gusset plates and the connections was performed using Abaqus simulation software. The analysis led to the conclusion that the collapse occurred due to the gusset plate having insufficient thickness to bear increased loads. The increased loads were due to modifications to the bridge in combination with enhanced concentrated loads due to
construction activities on the bridge on the day of the collapse. The contours in the picture show Von Mises stress values.

Figure 4. A close-up view of the bridge section where collapse initiated. Contours show Von Mises stress values. Image courtesy: National Transportation Safety Board [Ref. 1].

 

 

CATIA 3DEXPERIENCE contributes to two Construction Awards

Tuesday, December 5th, 2017

The following article was originally published by Geoff Haines on the Desktop Engineering Blog and is reprinted with permission.

The Institution of Structural Engineers has awarded the 2017 prize for Construction Innovation to the team that designed and built The TallWood House at Brock Commons – an 18-storey mass timber hybrid building at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Vancouver, Canada.

At 53m high, this student residence building has been recognized as the tallest mass timber hybrid building in the world. It is comprised of 17 storeys of five-ply cross laminated timber (CLT) floor panels, glue laminated timber columns.

Key to proving the construction process was the use of 3DEXPERIENCE to simulate the construction methods, from delivery of prefabricated parts to the work processes involved in assembling the building. CADMakers* used the 3DEXPERIENCEplatform to simulate in real time all these interactions and hence improve on methods in a digital world before committing to the real world.

See this video to compare the virtual with the real.

click-to-tweetTweet: The TallWood House at Brock Commons project in Vancouver was awarded the 2017 prize for Construction Innovation @CadMakersCo @3DSAEC #3DEXPERIENCE https://ctt.ec/Ye0xn+

Zaha Hadid Architects used CATIA 3DEXPERIENCE as the platform for the design of the world’s longest asymmetrical single stay bridge in Taiwan – The Danjiang Bridge. The design teams based in 3 locations across 2 continents used CATIA 3DEXPERIENCE On Cloud as the design and collaboration platform.
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Zaha Hadid Architects: The Danjiang Bridge

Friday, November 24th, 2017

The following article was originally published by Geoff Haines on the Desktop Engineering Blog and is reprinted with permission.

click-to-tweetTweet: An analysis of #ZahaHadid Architects’ Danjiang Bridge project @Desktop_Eng @ZHA_News @3DSAEC @aeccafe https://ctt.ec/5LX8C+

The Project

Located at the mouth of Tamsui River that flows through the capital Taipei, the Danjiang Bridge is integral to the infrastructure upgrading program of northern Taiwan. Commissioned through a competition by the Directorate General of Highways, Taiwan, R.O.C., the bridge will increase connectivity between neighbourhoods and reduce through-traffic on roads within local town centres.

By also reducing traffic from the congested Guandu Bridge upriver, the Danjiang Bridge will greatly improve the northern coast traffic system and enhance accessibility throughout the region with the rapidly expanding Port of Taipei/Taipei Harbour, the region’s busiest shipping port.

The Team

The winning design team comprised a joint venture collaboration between architects Zaha Hadid Architects based in London, acting as design consultants; lead structural engineer was Leonhardt, Andrä & Partner in Germany and Sinotech Engineering Consultants in Taiwan acting as local engineering consultants.
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Simulation in Architecture, Engineering, and Construction

Monday, November 20th, 2017

The following article is excerpted from SIMULATION IN ARCHITECTURE, ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION. To read more, download the full white paper here.

PRODUCT, NATURE, AND LIFE IN AEC

These are extraordinary times for civil engineering. Innovative structures such as hyper-loops, undersea hotels and made-to-order 3D-printed buildings, which were just concepts a few years ago, are no longer considered to be in the realm of fiction. These novel structures need to be designed for either transporting people through natural surroundings, protecting them from natural surroundings or allowing them to interact with natural surroundings.

click-to-tweetTweet: These are extraordinary times for #civilengineering @aeccafe @3DSAEC https://ctt.ec/kUB7t+

The commonalities that underlay these structures consist of intricate linkages between product, nature and life. The same is true for conventional civil engineering structures, including buildings, bridges, tunnels and dams.

The following image shows an innovative steel lattice structure, one of the Sun Valley structures constructed for Shanghai Expo 2010.

A steel lattice structure constructed for Shanghai Expo 2010. Image courtesy of Shanghai Xian Dai Architectural Design Group.

A steel lattice structure constructed for Shanghai Expo 2010. Image courtesy: Shanghai Xian Dai Architectural Design Group.
We need to think about product, nature and life together, not only for creating innovative designs, but also for providing optimal functionality, ensuring safety and safeguarding sustainability for ecological well-being.

Product, nature and life, therefore, need to play a conjoined role during planning for large engineering projects, such as city developments, large transportation projects, as well as dams and irrigation works.

How can we include product, nature and life in the design processes for civil structures? This will need to be done through realistic simulations that take into account precise geometry and material properties, realistic representations of physical and natural processes, and rational predictions of experiences by people.

click-to-tweetTweet: How can we include product, nature & life in the design processes for civil structures? #CivilEngineering @aeccafe @3DSAEC https://ctt.ec/UodMh+

Such simulations, in addition to the obvious need for ascertaining structural safety, also need to include the construction processes and sequences along with reliable estimates of construction and maintenance costs.

COMMON INDUSTRY CHALLENGES

Large construction projects often exhibit cost overruns and delays due to unforeseen events or design changes during construction.

As is well known, a judicious balance between cost, time and quality needs to be maintained in any construction project in order to have the resulting product as profitable, safe and sustainable as possible.

In a construction project, the architects and structural engineers first need to come up with a conceptual design that is appropriate for the intended function of the structure. Potential structural loads need to be identified, and the conceptual design needs to be guided by the efficiency of how these loads get transmitted within the structure and distributed to the foundations.

Any errors or inappropriate design choices at this stage can have significant time and cost implications on the final outcome. If the structural components are pre-fabricated, then these and the final structure need to be designed based on the ease of manufacturing the pre-fabricated parts, which can often contain specially designed new materials.

Also, the transportation of these parts and the final assembly processes need to be considered. A complete study on how early design choices affect the construction process, time and costs is, therefore, necessary.

Moreover, such studies need to be done quickly and also need to provide comprehensive data in order to enable architects and engineers to make proper comparisons between different conceptual designs.

Once the conceptual design has been chosen, engineers need to come up with an appropriately detailed final design. As the construction gets under way, some parts of the structure may need to be altered from their original design.

In these circumstances, one needs to be able to quickly identify the implications of any structural modifications on the safety and reliability of the final product. Also, the final design needs to be updated and information on the ensuing modifications needs to be accurately and promptly passed along to the engineers at construction sites.

ROLE OF SIMULATION

In architecture, virtual or graphical simulation models can help in arriving at conceptual designs, taking into account wide ranges of criteria, such as layout, positioning, landscaping and lighting. Also, realistic rendering can be used to help make depictions lifelike, adding to their value for clients.

In engineering, virtual representations can be used to idealize structural geometrical configurations. These configurations can then be used in computational analyses to predict structural deformations and stresses resulting from applied loading and support conditions.

Subsequent to such simulation analyses, the predicted data values can be visualized and examined. Based on these data values, engineers can ascertain the strength, stability and safety of the proposed structure, and can then finalize the structural design.

In construction, the finalized design is then used for material estimation and ordering, planning the construction sequence and managing the construction process using appropriate simulation tools.

As one can see, simulation helps in all three phases of any civil engineering project—conceptual and architectural design, engineering design and construction. Although individual tools are available to simulate these three phases separately, the use of such tools may result in potential loss of information when passed between different phases of the project.

click-to-tweetTweet: Simulation helps in all 3 phases of a #civilengineering project: conceptual/architectural, engineering, construction @aeccafe @3DSAEC https://ctt.ec/eme9O+

Civil engineering projects, hence, need simulation tools that seamlessly connect the architecture, engineering and construction phases. One such simulation tool is available from Dassault Systèmes.

Structure Design for Fabrication on the 3DEXPERIENCE® platform from Dassault Systèmes has been specifically developed to provide engineers and architects with a unified capability to virtually represent conceptual designs, perform engineering analyses, analyze construction sequences and manage construction projects all together, while keeping track of individual components. It provides a unique representation of the project as a whole, one which several users can remotely access in order to obtain information according to their individual needs. Any change in any component can be reflected throughout the project, including the effects on project schedule, and also likely implications on the structural loading and response.

In addition to Structure Design for Fabrication, Dassault Systèmes also provides solutions using Abaqus® simulation software for complex simulations and analyses, including for pre-stressed and reinforced concrete, for simulating the altered behavior of damaged structures, for geomechanics analyses for tunnels and foundations, and for seismic response analyses of complex structures.

Related Resource

Learn all about SIMULATION IN ARCHITECTURE, ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION. Download the White Paper.

SHoP Architects’ AEC Hackathon Experience

Thursday, November 2nd, 2017

SHoP Architects was one of the 17 architectural firms invited to participate in the 2017 AEC Hackathon earlier this year.

Dassault Systèmes’ Design in the Age of Experience Hackathon was a unique opportunity to create innovative building designs in under 24 hours with CATIA’s latest generative modeling applications on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform.

In this video, you’ll hear directly from the SHoP team about their experience, and see the beautiful designs they created during the event:

Tweet: Watch @SHoPArchitects debrief on their AEC Hackathon experience | @3DSAEC #3DEXPERIENCE @aeccafe https://ctt.ec/d8ruH+

Related Resources

Creativity Unleashed at the AEC Design Hackathon

AEC Industry Solution Experiences

CATIA AEC Engineering

“Future Testing” for Civil Engineering

Thursday, October 26th, 2017

The ideas presented in earlier posts on Future Testing (excerpted from Replacing Problem-Solving with Future Testing) can be applied to the discipline of engineering.

Future Testing for Engineering Firms

Traditionally, engineering firms review the architect’s conceptual designs and independently develop their engineering drawings. This is a wasteful step, which duplicates work and can misinterpret the architect’s intent. This disconnect between the designs also makes it incredibly difficult to test new ideas or incorporate changes from the architect.

Future Testing bridges the digital gap.

click-to-tweetTweet: #FutureTesting bridges the gap between architects’ conceptual designs & engineering drawings @aeccafe @3DSAEC https://ctt.ec/K1b7n+

It provides the ability for all stakeholders to collaborate on and visualize a virtual mockup of the project from start to completion in digital form, improving speed and building trust that the desired outcomes will be met.
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How CadMakers Applies “Future Testing”

Thursday, October 19th, 2017

Future Testing is a process that leverages virtual design and construction, simulation, and rapid iterations. With Future Testing, AEC project stakeholders are able to anticipate issues and opportunities early, reduce risk, take advantage of innovative ideas, and gain an edge on the competition.

An excellent example of a company employing the Future Testing method is CadMakers Inc., a construction and manufacturing technology company.

They work closely with AEC businesses to streamline projects from design to construction, leveraging leading engineering software solutions. Their design approach includes modeling all the building systems — architectural, structural, mechanical, electrical and plumbing, civil and geotechnical — and mapping them virtually in an accurate, virtual 3D model. Then, they get everyone — the project architect, engineers, and various subcontractors — together to view the model and crowdsource solutions to identified problems.
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To Create Next-Level Designs, Architects Turn to Adaptive Tools and Strategies

Thursday, October 5th, 2017

For Morphosis Architects in Los Angeles, the flexibility to innovate is at the heart of their work.

“Our work is a constant search for innovation,” comments Kerenza Harris, leader of Advanced Technology at Morphosis, in a recent video interview with Dassault Systèmes.

click-to-tweetTweet: “Our work is a constant search for innovation” #architecture
#design @M0rphosis @3DSAEC @aeccafe https://ctt.ec/xu1pE+

That innovation can be found in a number of areas, from the rough initial design idea and throughout the design process as the idea evolves and becomes more sophisticated and better defined.
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The New Paradigm Poised to Disrupt the AEC Industry: “FUTURE TESTING”

Thursday, September 28th, 2017

An advanced process in Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) allows project stakeholders to anticipate issues and opportunities early, therefore reducing risk, taking advantage of innovative ideas, and gaining an edge on the competition.

We call it “Future Testing” and it enables AEC teams to:

  • Reduce waste and costs
  • Identify opportunities early
  • Learn lessons in the virtual world first
  • Apply new methods and alternatives

click-to-tweetTweet: Has #FutureTesting replaced problem solving
in #AEC? @3DSAEC @aeccafe https://ctt.ec/IR44V+

The time is now for AEC companies to replace Problem Solving with Future Testing. Those that don’t take advantage of the opportunity will fall behind. Those that adopt Future Testing will build confidence and trust with their customers by showing they can anticipate issues and opportunities in advance, and adapt to inevitable changes as they occur with speed and precision.

Industry leaders are learning to uncover opportunities for innovation, and avoid issues, by experiencing the build process in a digital, virtual environment before the windows of opportunity close due to limitations of what’s already been constructed.

They’re moving beyond the era of firefighting by anticipating and avoiding problems through simulation.

In addition, they’re employing a Future Testing Cycle to learn from physical and virtual work and improve and simplify construction processes as they go.

The benefits of Future Testing apply not only to the owner, but also to architects, engineers, suppliers, contractors, and the whole team. This approach gives every constituent confidence in the process and the outcome because they’ve experienced it virtually.

click-to-tweetTweet: Has #FutureTesting replaced problem solving
in #AEC? @3DSAEC @aeccafe https://ctt.ec/IR44V+

Learn all about Future Testing through real world examples from CADMAKERS, SHoP ARCHITECTS, SMEDI, A. ZAHNER COMPANY, and HARDSTONE CONSTRUCTION in our Dassault Systemès white paper: Replacing Problem-Solving with Future-Testing: The New Paradigm Poised to Disrupt the AEC Industry.

 

Qingdao Focus – Dassault Systèmes Greater China AEC Industry Forum

Friday, September 22nd, 2017

On September 14th, 2017, Dassault Systèmes held the Greater China AEC Industry Forum in Qingdao, China. Hosting industry leaders from around the country, the forum introduced Dassault Systèmes development strategy and global experience in the construction and energy industries. Participants learned about Dassault Systèmes “3DEXPERIENCE” BIM solution platform, as well as the company’s successes in municipal projects, roads and railways, water conservancy and hydropower projects, and other sectors.

click-to-tweetTweet: Tweet: Focus on #Qingdao: A recap of @Dassault3DS’s Greater China #AEC & Energy Forum https://ctt.ec/hQf7e+

The Belt and Road Forum for International Cooperation, held in Beijing in May 2017, reaffirmed China’s commitment to promoting the integration of land, sea, air, and the Internet. While promoting metropolitan area development, the “Belt and Road” strategy also focuses heavily on infrastructure development. In this context, Dassault Systèmes is continually improving upon its “3DEXPERIENCE” solutions platform, and is striving to support data integration and coordination across the lifetime of infrastructure projects using 3D data simulation technology and BIM management platforms. This helps companies in design, construction, operation, and other project phases reap the benefits of digital technology.
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