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 3DEXPERIENCE Construction

Archive for the ‘Lean Construction’ Category

Watch the “Optimized Construction” Industry Solution Experience in Action [VIDEO]

Thursday, January 21st, 2016

NOW AVAILABLE: a demonstration video of Optimized Construction from Dassault Systèmes.

In this webinar, you will observe interactions between a general contractor and a subcontractor, facilitated by Optimized Construction on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform.

Optimized construction demo video 1

When the subcontractor shares a 3D model with the general contractor, it’s a smooth exchange. Multiple project contributors may be employed by different organizations and still work together seamlessly within a single environment.

In the Design-Review process, the subcontractor reviews and validates an installation, and makes a suggestion to enhance the work instructions.

An interactive Work Breakdown Structure enables the general contractor to segregate project tasks by type, and delegate each task to the appropriate worker. The status of each task is tracked within the 3D model.

Dashboards offer various views, including a Phase Gate view and an Issue Summary view, for the general contractor to manage the project using integrated project plans.


Think a Zero RFI Goal Is Impossible? Consider These Strategies for Improving Project Coordination

Thursday, October 29th, 2015

click-to-tweetClick to Tweet: “Early collaboration can reduce RFIs,
reduce change orders on AEC projects”

Reducing RFIs, reducing change orders

The typical commercial construction project generates on the order of 3,000 to 20,000 RFIs (Requests for Information). It’s a staggering number, especially considering reviewing and documenting each RFI takes time. Studies show each RFI resolution costs about $1,000 in time and labor, even when BIM design tools are utilized.

RFIs are an indication of a lack of understanding of the design, as well as a lack of close coordination among the project teams. Further, RFIs are the source of changes in scope, costing the project owner more time and money than expected.

click-to-tweetClick to Tweet: “AEC projects generate 3k-20k RFIs per
project; indicates lack of understanding & coordination”

For AEC teams aiming to improve performance and predictability in construction, the goal should be to reduce RFIs as much as possible.

Spotlight on MEMKO: Pushing Collaboration Across the Project Life Cycle to Revolutionize Design and Construction

Thursday, September 3rd, 2015

When Miro Miletic began his career with Boeing in the 1990s, the aviation industry was at the precipice of tremendous change.

Although designers still produced paper drawings for each aircraft, 3DCAD was emerging as a drawing alternative.

Miro Miletic, Managing Director and founder of MEMKO PTY LTD

Miro Miletic, Managing Director and founder of MEMKO PTY LTD

With the 777, Miletic was part of the team to design and build an aircraft using 3D CAD as the master model.

The next step was the 787: the first aircraft designed without paper using Model Based Definition (MBD). Everyone, from supply to production, worked from digital models. The design process realized incredible new efficiencies with this move.

Today, from his position as founder of technology service provider MEMKO Pty Ltd. in Australia, Miletic is urging the AEC industry to recognize the efficiencies it, too, stands to gain from a digital transition.

Jumping Across Industries

His decades as a Boeing executive also gave Miletic an appreciation for the art of integrating solutions across industries. Since founding MEMKO in 2007, Miletic has been more focused than ever on that goal. MEMKO provides technology solutions, engineering and training for a variety of industries, including aerospace, defence, architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) and others.


Optimized Planning: Analyze and verify your construction sequence before breaking ground

Thursday, August 20th, 2015

Screen Shot 2015-08-11 at 2.37.07 PM

The Optimized Planning Industry Process Experience is for construction planners, project managers, and safety engineers to collaborate on a digital model that is true to the reality of the construction process.

It allows teams to simulate and validate critical project activities—even worker tasks—before arriving onsite.


Five Steps to Industrialized Construction

Thursday, June 18th, 2015


This post is an excerpt from the paper, “Industrialization of the Construction Industry,” by Dr. Perry Daneshgari and  Dr. Heather Moore of  MCA Inc.

In today’s construction environment the value transferred to the customer for every dollar spent is only around 46 cents.  More than 40% of the tradesmens’ time on a job site is spent on material handling; most of the work on a job site is performed by highly trained and paid skill tradesmen.

Tweet: Over 40% of tradesmen’ time on a #construction job site is spent on material handling @3DSAEC @Dassault3DS #AEC #BIM to tweet: “Over 40% of tradesmen’ time
on a #construction job site is spent on material handling”

To achieve comparable results as have been seen in the manufacturing and other industries the construction industry has to take these same five steps:

1. Segregation of Work

The most important contribution of Fredrick Taylor’s work to industrialization of manufacturing was his ability to observe the skilled and unskilled tradesmen at work for a long period of time and being able to breakdown the conducted work. Once the work was broken-down it could then be managed by better management of time, location and contributing resources.

Once the work was visible and understood, it could be designed in the most optimal manner, and segregated amongst the resources available.

Taylor manufacturing resized

“Principles of Scientific Management” by Fredrick Taylor


Industrializing Construction: Solutions for Productivity Breakthroughs

Thursday, June 4th, 2015

This post is an excerpt from the paper, “Industrialization of the Construction Industry,” by Dr. Perry Daneshgari and  Dr. Heather Moore of  MCA Inc.

An important study by the National Research Council, Advancing the Competitiveness and Efficiency of the U.S. Construction Industry” identified solutions for breakthrough improvement of productivity.

Five Key Areas for Productivity Improvements in Construction

  1. Widespread deployment and use of interoperable technology applications.
  2. Improved job-site efficiency through a more effective interface of people, processes, materials, equipment, and information.
  3. Greater use of pre-fabrication, pre-assembly, modularization, and off-site fabrication techniques and processes.
  4. Innovative, widespread use of demonstration installations.
  5. Improved performance measurement to drive efficiency and support innovation.

Tweet: Do you know the 5 Key Areas for Productivity Improvements in Construction? @3DSAEC @Dassault3DS #AEC to tweet: “Do you know the 5 Key Areas for
Productivity Improvements in #Construction?”

These findings are very much in line with what the manufacturing industry had realized after the advent of industrialization. The Industrial revolution, which started in mid 1700, led to an increase in population due to the first time in the human history that production levels were higher than self-consumption of the working man.

Timeline of Industrialization

With higher population also came new markets and customers. The production facilities had to become more productive.


Challenges Driving the Industrialization of Construction

Thursday, May 28th, 2015


This post is an excerpt from the paper, “Industrialization of the Construction Industry,” by Dr. Perry Daneshgari and  Dr. Heather Moore of  MCA Inc.

Dr. Perry Daneshgari, MCA Inc


A monumental and historical study conducted by the National Research Council of the National Academies on behalf of NIST outlined the challenges and obstacles facing the construction industry.

Fragmentation of the Industry

“The sheer number of construction firms (760,000 in 2004) and their size—only 2 percent had 100 or more workers, while 80 percent had 10 or fewer workers—make it difficult to effectively deploy new technologies, best practices, or other innovations across a critical mass of owners, contractors, and subcontractors.

The industry is also segmented into least four distinct sectors—residential, commercial, industrial, and heavy construction.

Tweet: Construction is fragmented: only 2% have 100+ workers while 80% have 10 or fewer. @3DSAEC @Dassault3DS #AEC to tweet: “Construction is fragmented: only 2%
have 100+ workers while 80% have 10 or fewer.”


The Case for Industrialization of the Construction Industry

Thursday, May 7th, 2015


This post is an excerpt from the paper, “Industrialization of the Construction Industry,” by Dr. Perry Daneshgari and  Dr. Heather Moore of  MCA Inc.

Like many other industries the construction industry is under constant pressure to improve productivity, reduce cost, and minimize waste in the operation.

While the productivity in the manufacturing industry has improved by four hundred percent (400%) over the last century, the construction industry’s productivity has, in the best case, stayed flat or turned negative.


Enabling Flow: Knowledge Based Construction

Thursday, April 23rd, 2015


This post is an excerpt from the white paper, Lean Construction ‐ Advanced Project Delivery for the AEC Industry, from Dassault Systèmes’ Value Solution Business Partner CornerCube.

As organizations begin to understand the power of adopting an LPD approach to their programs and projects, they realize that a change process is underway and recognize that the production system is highly complex and dynamic.  Every project has a lifecycle beginning with the business case and defining requirements to final installation and beneficial use.  During the progression of the project’s lifecycle, the opportunity to influence or optimize the project’s development and eventual outcome lessens dramatically.

Tweet: As an #AEC project progresses, opportunity to optimize the outcome lessens dramatically @3DSAEC @Dassault3DS #BIM to tweet: “As an #AEC project progresses,
opportunity to optimize the outcome lessens dramatically”

CornerCube White Paper Project Production Transformation


Nine Lean Concepts to Improve Project Outcomes

Thursday, March 19th, 2015

“Good is the enemy of Great” – Jim Collins

To expect better outcomes is a poor strategy. “Good enough” stifles creativity and innovation in project delivery.  Achieving better outcomes requires a persistent, proactive effort from organizations that want to gain competitive advantage by providing more value to their customers.

Lean Project Delivery (LPD) is a production management‐based approach to project delivery that is applied from concept to start-of-operations.  It is based on Lean principles and methodologies and is configured for the construction industry.


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