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Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal loves modern architecture. He comes from a family of builders who have built more than 20 projects in the last ten years near Delhi in India. He has recently started writing about the architectural projects that catch his imagination.

new Space for the Arango House in Madrid, Spain by Elisa Valero Ramos

 
August 5th, 2011 by Sumit Singhal

Article source: Elisa Valero Ramos

A Crossed Garden

Sharpening one’s gaze, discovering the beauty behind everyday events, being able to capture it and make it one’s own, allowing it to change one; that is the Gordian knot of the creative process, and this work is constructed in a context that is especially appropriate for it. Located on an estate near the mountains of El Escorial, the intervention responds to the need to join two houses that constitute a single living space whose peculiarity is the present of significant works of art.

Images Courtesy Fernando Alda

  • ARCHITECT: Elisa Valero Ramos
  • NAME OF PROJECT: new Space for the Arango House
  • LOCATION: Madrid, Spain
  • DEVELOPER: D. Plácido Arango Arias
  • BUILDING SURVEYORS: Juan Fernández y Jesús Martínez
  • PHOTOGRAPHER: Fernando Alda
  • Software used: AutoCAD

Images Courtesy Fernando Alda

  • PROJECT YEAR: 2007
  • CONSTRUCTION YEAR: 2008
  • COLLABORATING ARCHITECT: Leonardo Tapiz Buzarra
  • INSTALLATIONS ENGINEER: Luis Ollero
  • CONSTRUCTOR: Granitos Luman
  • WORK´S BUDGET: 780.267 euros
  • SURFACES: 501 m2

Images Courtesy Fernando Alda

Thus, the project is conceived as a container that makes it possible to live with the paintings and sculptures of a unique collection through which we discover the singular gaze of Plácido Arango.

Interior View (Images Courtesy Fernando Alda)

Unlike a museum—a place for admiring and encountering art from time to time—this project faces the challenge of creating a living space in which light and the relation with nature are particularly important. Deep inside a bit of garden with oak and cork trees, a new connection is established between the two houses it separates. The first house has a large reception hall, while the second has the more private rooms, library and bedrooms. The union takes the form of rooms buried like tubers, whose shapes are adapted to avoid interfering with tree roots than cannot be damaged.

Interior View (Images Courtesy Fernando Alda)

With the freedom of someone unconcerned with appearances (the project does not emerge, it does not appear above ground) the walls bend, happily and uninhibitedly accepting simplicity as a synonym of precision, a simplicity that dissolves the complexity that is inherent in architecture.

Interior View (Images Courtesy Fernando Alda)

Interior View (Images Courtesy Fernando Alda)

Interior View (Images Courtesy Fernando Alda)

Detail section

Final plans

Initial plans

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Categories: Autocad, Museum

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