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Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal loves modern architecture. He comes from a family of builders who have built more than 20 projects in the last ten years near Delhi in India. He has recently started writing about the architectural projects that catch his imagination.

Sport Hall Annex Landheim Brüttisellen in Riedtstrasse, Bassersdorf-Baltenswil by L3P Architekten ETH FH SIA AG

 
October 9th, 2011 by Sumit Singhal

Article source: L3P Architekten ETH FH SIA  AG

Thirty-two socially challenged youths live in the occupational training home in Brüttisellen where they also must spend their leisure time. The range of leisure time activities has been increased through the development of the 5/10/5 metre sport hall annex and the two adjoining fitness studios. Through the double use of existing adjoining rooms, the volume of the new building has been coupled with the main building.

Exterior View (Images Courtesy Sabrina Scheja, Heerbrugg)

  • Architecture: L3P Architekten ETH FH SIA  AG
  • Name of Project: Sport Hall Annex Landheim Brüttisellen
  • Location: Riedtstrasse 9, 8303 Bassersdorf-Baltenswil
  • Object Description: Anbau Sporthalle Landheim Brüttisellen
  • Construction: Caspar-Appenzeller-Stiftung, Neue Winterthurerstrasse 40, 8303 Bassersdorf-Baltenswil
  • Photography: Sabrina Scheja, Heerbrugg

Exterior View (Images Courtesy Sabrina Scheja, Heerbrugg)

  • Construction Management: Thomet Bauleitungen Planungen AG, Kloten; Alberto De Giorgi
  • Civil Engineer: Bona + Fischer Ingenieurbüro AG, Winterthur; Markus Fischer
  • Electrical Engineer: Elektro-Design + Partner AG, Winterthur; A. Baiker
  • Heating Engineer: Hans Spillmann AG, Kloten; Martin Nötzli
  • Ventilation Engineer: Thermatic AG, Zürich; Martin Oberholzer
  • Sanitation Engineer: Sanitär Krucker AG, Brüttisellen; Paul Vogel
  • Building physics: Wichser Akustik & Bauphysik AG, Zürich; Stephan Huber
  • Planning Begin: April 2009
  • Construction Time: March 2010 to July 2010
  • Start of Operation: 23.August 2010
  • Total space rebuilt after SIA 416: 980 m3
  • Gross Floor Space: 156 m2
  • Capital Expenditure (BKP 1–9): CHF 1 Mio.
  • Building Occupancy Expenses (BKP 2/m3): CHF 710/m3 (SIA 116); CHF 840/m3 (SIA 416)

Exterior View (Images Courtesy Sabrina Scheja, Heerbrugg)

As a flat building with the main body sunk 3 metres into the ground, the extension closes the central garden courtyard off into an access road. The contemporary design stands as a symbol for the development, respectively for the accomplishment of the buildings development between 2006 and 2011. The newly developed ensemble with administration, accommodation groups, schooling and leisure comprises all the building stages up until now and is upgraded to a centre embodied in a newly acquired free space.

Interior View (Images Courtesy Sabrina Scheja, Heerbrugg)

The circumferential window band of the new building shows the curious visitor under the spell, one wants (and is allowed) to know which function underlies this building. The façade becomes transparent and a view in the courtyard is desired. With the evening bustle artificial light supports the meaning of the newly articulated middle point of the home.

Images Courtesy Sabrina Scheja, Heerbrugg

The building is punctured through the circumferential window band, only a few precisely-assembled concrete support columns take over the reduction of the load and the bracing of the roof. The statics system, without a fixed grid dimension and with differing gradients of the concrete columns, is a part of the architectural concept. The total outer shell of the building, including the roof, is reduced to the materials concrete and glass. The raw concrete is façade, statics, earthquake resistance, moisture proofing and robust all in one. The interior with its moisture barrier, insulation, soundproofing and a sturdy surface in wood is the energy-efficient quick reacting inner core. Totally within the proven concept – hard outer shell, soft core.

Images Courtesy Sabrina Scheja, Heerbrugg

The interior wooden panelling is from large-sized plywood boarding of French Jerusalem or Aleppo pine. To achieve an optimal acoustic, 85% of the boarding needed to be perforated. The non-perforated surfaces from approximately 40m2 were distributed through the room, so that a spiel between perforated and non-perforated boarding was generated.

Images Courtesy Sabrina Scheja, Heerbrugg

Images Courtesy Sabrina Scheja, Heerbrugg

Side View (Images Courtesy Sabrina Scheja, Heerbrugg)

Images Courtesy Sabrina Scheja, Heerbrugg

Side View (Images Courtesy Sabrina Scheja, Heerbrugg)

Exterior View (Images Courtesy Sabrina Scheja, Heerbrugg)

Situation

Grundriss

Plan 01

Plan 02

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Category: Sports Hall

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