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Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal loves modern architecture. He comes from a family of builders who have built more than 20 projects in the last ten years near Delhi in India. He has recently started writing about the architectural projects that catch his imagination.

House on Fire Island in New York by RESOLUTION: 4 ARCHITECTURE

 
October 16th, 2011 by Sumit Singhal

Article source: Joseph Tanney, Robert Luntz

Located on Fire Island, a barrier island off of Long Island, NY, this bayfront house is the summer retreat for a family who lives and works in Manhattan.

The house is designed as two distinct volumes, to provide the parents and their adult children with separate quarters for living and entertaining. The volumes are clad in cedar and connected by a glass bridge, sheltering a courtyard and pool, which receive western exposure for maximum daylight.

Exterior View (Images Courtesy RES4)

  • Architect: RESOLUTION: 4 ARCHITECTURE – Joseph Tanney, Robert Luntz
  • Name of Project: House on Fire Island
  • Location: Fire Island, New York
  • Project Architect: Paul Coughlin
  • Photographer: © RES4

Exterior View (Images Courtesy RES4)

  • Project Team: Jerome Engelking , Craig Kim, Michael MacDonald
  • Contractor: Island Painting & Contracting
  • Completion Date: 2008
  • Size: 3379 sf
  • Typology: Courtyard Series
  • Program:
    • Bedrooms: 5
    • Baths: 4
    • Features: Roof Deck, Pool, Outdoor Shower, Media Room, Guest Suite, Balcony

 

Images Courtesy RES4

The design of the house prioritizes views and access to the outdoors. The typical configuration of private spaces stacked on top of a lower public zone is flipped; in this residence, the communal upper level enjoys the best views and access to outdoor decks for entertaining. Kitchen, dining, and living space flows out to the bay beyond, ideal for watching summer sunsets. Large expanses of glass, in the form of continuous sliding doors break down the boundary between interior and exterior, and add to the airy, openess of the house.

 

Images Courtesy RES4

The house embraces local island traditions, through both its construction process and its design. Cars are prohibited on the small island, so the house and its material were brought on barges to the site. The primary mode of transportation on the island is wagons and bikes. The design of the large curving entry ramp accommodates for this mode of transportation, allowing wagons to be wheeled right up to the front door. Plenty of parking for bikes is also provided. Natural ground cover of beach grasses and brush keep the site low maintenance and sensitive to local vegetation. The cedar siding ages to a silvery grey, and adapts this modern volume to the beachfront vernacular.

 

Stairs (Images Courtesy RES4)

Images Courtesy RES4

Interior View (Images Courtesy RES4)

Interior View (Images Courtesy RES4)

Exterior View (Images Courtesy RES4)

Exterior View (Images Courtesy RES4)

Images Courtesy RES4

Images Courtesy RES4

Stairs (Images Courtesy RES4)

Images Courtesy RES4

Images Courtesy RES4

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Category: House

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