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Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal loves modern architecture. He comes from a family of builders who have built more than 20 projects in the last ten years near Delhi in India. He has recently started writing about the architectural projects that catch his imagination.

Theatre de Saint-Nazaire in Paris, France by K-Architecture

 
December 19th, 2012 by Sumit Singhal

Article source: K-Architecture

The site on which the theatre is built has seen some glamorous times. In its days as a train station, it would welcome the rich socialites coming off the transatlantic liners. Opened in 1867, ten years after the Paris-Saint-Nazaire line started running, the station is a variation on Hausmannian neo-classicism, in the style of the Parisian stations.

Image Courtesy © luc boegly

  • Architects: K-Architecture
  • Project: Theatre de Saint-Nazaire
  • Location: Paris, France
  • Photography: Patrick Miara, luc boegly
  • Contracting team: Sonadev for the City of Saint-Nazaire
  • Project management Architect: – K-architectures, Karine Herman et Jérôme Sigwalt, architects Olivier Jonchère, architecte chef de projet Alexandre Plantady, architecte chef de projet esquisse
  • Consultants: Changement à Vue (stage design), Altia (acoustics), Alto (fluids), Khephren (structure), Bougon (economist)

Image Courtesy © Patrick Miara

  • Building Dimensions:  
    • total area = 3,900 m² (usable floor space) including
    • reception: 570 m²
    • auditorium: 2,025 m²
    • rehearsal space: 465 m²
    • offices: 295 m²
    • technical premises: 545 m²
  • Height:
    • rehearsal space = 13.20 m
    • auditorium = 18 m
    • stage = 24.50 m
  • Stages:
    • main stage area: 350 m²
    • Rehearsal stage area: 250 m²
    • Arch dimensions: 18 m x 9m
    • 3 levels of platform in the stage area
    • height = 19 m to the grid
    • depth under the stage = 3 m
    • orchestra pit for 50 to 60 musicians

Image Courtesy © luc boegly

  • Capacity:
    • 773 to 826 in all,
    • including 18 for persons with reduced mobility
    • Construction
    • 6,500 m3 of concrete
    • 8,800 m² of concrete floors
    • 190 tonnes of concrete steel
    • 50 companies, altogether
    • 40 to 50 workers over 24 months of work
  • Budget: 16.4 M€ of works, including tax (of which 15% assigned to stage design) and a 21 M€ overall construction and redevelopment budget, including taxes.

Image Courtesy © luc boegly

  • Funding:
    • The City of Saint-Nazaire, CARENE,
    • The Département of Loire Atlantique,
    • The Région Pays of Loire, the European Union and the State.
    • Feder : 1.6 M€
    • State : 1.2 M€
    • Regional Council: 3.1 M€
    • General council: 1.7 M€
    • CARENE: 2 M€
    • The City of Saint-Nazaire: 11.4 M€, including tax

Image Courtesy © luc boegly

  • Project Schedule:
    • February 2007: appeal for offers sent out
    • May 2008: project awarded to K-architectures
    • May 2008 – March 2009: studies for the project
    • May 2009: definitive approval for the project
    • End of 2009: consulting companies
    • Mai 2010: start of works on site
    • April 2012: end of works on site

Image Courtesy © luc boegly

During the Second World War, the Germans built a submarine base nearby. This giant bunker was targeted by the allies, and their bombing campaign was so devastating, it destroyed two thirds of the city. The station sustained major damages and was abandoned. The area became confined to industrial activity, and it was only very recently that the City decided to redevelop it with the massive City-Port1 project. The theatre is a key part of this development.

Image Courtesy © luc boegly

The site entrance is now framed by the remnants of the old station, two pavilions linked by an arcade. These two sturdy sentinels frame a space once filled by the platforms and their glass and iron hall.

Image Courtesy © luc boegly

This empty space is the main reminder of the site’s history and is now called the nave. As for the two pavilions, they constitute the frontispiece for this new cultural haven, while retaining their independence and integrity.

Image Courtesy © luc boegly

Around the building  

Access

Audiences enter the theatre via the old station arcades, as well as from the new car park built to the North.

Image Courtesy © luc boegly

Ticket office and administration pavilions

The pavilions have been restored, retaining marks from their history, including scars from bombing and the long period during which they were abandoned, when their openings were walled up. Thus, their bays have been partially re-opened. The eastern pavilion, furthest from the theatre, houses the administration.

Image Courtesy © luc boegly

The western pavilion, formerly the buffet in the station, is home to the ticket office. This space is fitted with ten panels3 which formerly adorned the walls of the show room in the ocean liner France (1962-1979). They were removed when the transatlantic liner was reconverted into an cruise vessel .

Image Courtesy © luc boegly

The pannels were bought by the city of Saint-Nazaire in an auction in Norway The Mayor of Saint-Nazaire then asked the architects to find a special place for them in “his” future theatre.

Image Courtesy © luc boegly

Entrance hall and foyer

Once past the arcades, the audience enters into the interior courtyard then, on the left, crosses the entrance hall which gives onto the main staircases leading to the auditorium.

Image Courtesy © luc boegly

The space is designed as a neutral entity, providing a fluid transition between exterior and interior. With its minimal design, it slips discreetly in between the theatre and the station frontispiece. Its roof terrace, accessible during opening hours, extends as a footbridge to the second pavilion – a possible future connection.

Image Courtesy © luc boegly

It spans the Place des Frères Pereire and may be used as a frame for outdoor elements of a set. Approaching the auditorium, the hall becomes a foyer and takes on the stature of a monument,

Image Courtesy © luc boegly

Stage and backstage

In the auditorium, a 3 m deep and 16.7 m wide proscenium arch extends into an orchestra pit which provides space for an extra two rows of seats. Six seats for persons with reduced mobility are spread over three levels, with inductive loops for audience members with impaired hearing.

Image Courtesy © luc boegly

There are also three platforms for lighting equipment, a closed lighting box, and a possible area for a lighting box between the audience and the side galleries. Under the entirely “removable” floor there is a space 3m deep. A grid is used for moving scenery, machinery, lighting, or sound equipment. Above, there are three platforms which serve as rigs: The first is 10m high, for lighting, the second 13m for machinery, the third, 16m for loading counter-weights.

Image Courtesy © Patrick Miara

Rehearsal Room

The rehearsal room provides artists with the space needed in any creative process. The room provides wonderful flexibility: resident artists can prepare their shows in real conditions. At the same time, a show can be performed in the main auditorium, thus ensuring continuity in programming.

Image Courtesy © Patrick Miara

The rehearsal and devising space is specially designed for ideas, research and creative work. This room also has space to set up scenery to test lighting states on it, as well as on actors. The floor is laid on a double ledger board, for dancing. Lighting equipment is attached to a platform which runs right around the playing space.

Image Courtesy © Patrick Miara

Auditorium

The design invites complicity between the raw expression of the stage and the luxurious red velvet world of the classical theatre auditorium. The room seats 826. The stalls by themselves provide seating for an audience of 550, including 110 raked retractable seats which give place to an orchestra pit. A balcony which stretches around the auditorium on both sides provides 350 extra seats.

Image Courtesy © Patrick Miara

The design thus places the audience at the heart of the auditorium. Experience has shown that the audience has more of a feeling of being in the show when laid out in this configuration, and their focus is more intense. This auditorium is sober and solid, as if hewn from the stone in a quarry. The thick and generous textile on the seats is the only concessions to comfort. This contrasting juxtaposition has been sought to create a quasi dramaturgical connection between spectators and auditorium during the minutes before the show.

Image Courtesy © Patrick Miara

Patio, dressing rooms and artists’ foyer

The devising centre and the dressing rooms are located behind the backstage and are spread around a private patio. Several comfortable dressing rooms with sound and video links have been designed. Next to them, the foyer provides artists who are performing or are in residencies with a space to eat and relax.

Section : Image Courtesy K-Architecture

Technical premises

The technical premises are spread around the delivery area on the northern extremity of the site and provide direct access to backstage, the workshops and the devising centre. The technical area is dressed in resistant wood, while in the public space, light and luminous concrete alternates with engraved patterns. The technical gallery, which is decorated, is the waiting space for artists. This is also where the building’s utilities can be accessed (electric cables, rain water piping, etc.)

Plan : Image Courtesy K-Architecture

Loading bay

All types of lorry can unload parts of set and materials for shows, out of the way of bad weather and the audience’s view. Equipment is unloaded directly onto the stage, into the rehearsal room, or into the storage room opposite.

Plan : Image Courtesy K-Architecture

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Category: Theater

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