Open side-bar Menu
 ArchShowcase
Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal loves modern architecture. He comes from a family of builders who have built more than 20 projects in the last ten years near Delhi in India. He has recently started writing about the architectural projects that catch his imagination.

Hillside House in Suzhou, China by Pu Miao Architecture

 
February 15th, 2014 by Sumit Singhal

Article source: Pu Miao Architecture

Hillside houses tend to belong to one of the two types, the terraces and the tower. While the tower has a more prominent visual appearance, the stepped profile of the terraces allows residents in the rooms same-level accesses to exterior spaces. This design explores a third type–the combined–that takes advantages from both existing models and minimizes their shortcomings. The new prototype tries to produce a better relationship between indoor and outdoor spaces, recreating the traditional Chinese courtyard space on a hillside site. This is part of the author’s experiment to localize Modern Architecture.

South elevation (the wall around the lower courtyard and the pool were not built) , Image Courtesy © Pu Miao Architecture

  • Architects: Pu Miao Architecture
  • Project: Hillside House
  • Location: Suzhou, China
  • Software used: Autocad.
  • Project Period: 2001-2002
  • Floor Area: 250 square meters
  • Client: Shanghai Huaxin Construction and Development Co., Ltd.
  • Designer: Miao Design Studio (Design Architect), Pu Miao, Luo Jirun; Textile Industry Design and Research Institute of Jiangsu Province (Architect of Record). Interior design was by other parties.

Entrance in the north elevation, Image Courtesy © Pu Miao Architecture

Situated on the southern side of the mountains facing the Lake Taihu, this 250-square-meter house in the Green Valley development, Suzhou, commands a panoramic view of the Lake, one of the largest in China.

The house consists of two volumes. Containing the Foyer, Dining, and Living Rooms, the east one assumes the terraced shape, providing a generous Roof Garden in front of the Living Room. In contrast, the west component which houses the Study and Guest Room takes the tower form. The trellises roof of the tower extends over the Roof Garden of the terraces, thus interlocking the two L-shaped volumes together, formally as well as functionally. A glass-enclosed sky bridge between the two volumes further strengthens the connection.

A slit in the Foyer allows a glimpse toward the Lake., Image Courtesy © Pu Miao Architecture

A central outdoor space (or upper courtyard) is formed in the middle of the embraced forms. In the gap between the two volumes, a series of steps crosses under the bridge and connects the upper courtyard to a lower one which provides garden space for the bedrooms at the bottoms of both the tower and the terrace. The visual channel along the gap allows rooms even at the northern side of the upper courtyard to have a view of the Lake.

Dining Room and the adjacent side yard, Image Courtesy © Pu Miao Architecture

Dining Room,with Foyer in distance and Living Room on the left, Image Courtesy © Pu Miao Architecture

From Dining looking downward into Living Room and the adjacent Roof Garden, Image Courtesy © Pu Miao Architecture

From Living looking upward into Dining Room, Image Courtesy © Pu Miao Architecture

The Roof Garden in front of the Living Room , Image Courtesy © Pu Miao Architecture

From the lower courtyard on the south looking through the gap between the two building volumes, Image Courtesy © Pu Miao Architecture

From the corridor under the bridge looking toward the central outdoor space (upper courtyard) , Image Courtesy © Pu Miao Architecture

From the bedroom at the northern side looking through the gap between the two building volumes toward the Lake, Image Courtesy © Pu Miao Architecture

From the central outdoor space (upper courtyard) looking through the bridge toward the Lake and the lower courtyard, Image Courtesy © Pu Miao Architecture

The central outdoor space (upper courtyard) embraced by the two building volumes, as seen from the west side of the building, Image Courtesy © Pu Miao Architecture

Upper: The three types for the hillside house Lower: Two kinds of relationship between indoor and outdoor spaces, Image Courtesy © Pu Miao Architecture

Image Courtesy © Pu Miao Architecture

Image Courtesy © Pu Miao Architecture

Related posts:

Tags: ,

Categories: Autocad, House

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

GRAPHISOFT: ARCHICAD download 30-day FREE trial
Graphisoft ARCHICAD  Download a 30-Day FREE trial
TurboCAD pro : Start at $299
CADalog.com - Countless CAD add-ons, plug-ins and more.



Internet Business Systems © 2016 Internet Business Systems, Inc.
595 Millich Dr., Suite 216, Campbell, CA 95008
+1 (408)-337-6870 — Contact Us, or visit our other sites:
TechJobsCafe - Technical Jobs and Resumes EDACafe - Electronic Design Automation GISCafe - Geographical Information Services  MCADCafe - Mechanical Design and Engineering ShareCG - Share Computer Graphic (CG) Animation, 3D Art and 3D Models
  Privacy Policy