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Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal loves modern architecture. He comes from a family of builders who have built more than 20 projects in the last ten years near Delhi in India. He has recently started writing about the architectural projects that catch his imagination.

Jalan Mat Jambol in Singapore by Zarch Collaboratives

 
May 17th, 2014 by Sumit Singhal

Article source: Zarch Collaboratives

Approaching the house from the street level, one notices a raw, chamfered concrete fascia. The windowless façade reveals the interior of the house, almost as if the house is still in a state of construction, primitive in its language of expression. The raw elevation provides glimpses of a spiral staircase drum, with a seemingly makeshift timber box protruding from the articulated structural elements, augmenting the sense of theatrics in a neighbourhood of quiet terrace houses.

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

  • Architects: Zarch Collaboratives
  • Project: Jalan Mat Jambol
  • Location: Jalan Mat Jambol, Singapore
  • Photography: Albert Lim
  • Completion Time: 2012
  • Project Team: Randy Chan
  • Site Area: 1700 sq ft (Built up 3700 sq ft)
  • Text Write up: Jolene Lee

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

The open design of the house boldly experiments with the notions of tropical dwelling, where sustainability is interpreted through the harnessing of natural elements through passive means. Located near the sea, the openness of the façade allows for cross-ventilation, where a continuous breeze can be enjoyed through the house at all times of the day, reducing the reliance on mechanical cooling systems and harkening back to principles of vernacular tropical dwellings.

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

This open façade is made possible through a key element in the design – an overall overhang with a 2m recess providing shelter and security, where the recess allows for a greater sense of privacy for the interior spaces of the house and at the same time, shielding the main spaces of the house from the intensity of the tropical sun and rain.

It also functions as a defined patio space on the second storey overlooking the expanse of green in front of the house.

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

Hidden within is a 12m bio pool located on the second storey which stretches through the entire length of the house along the shared parti wall. A key space in the house, this bio pool anchors the main communal space, extending into the kitchen and dining area. Together with the cross ventilation allowed by the non-façade treatment, it acts to cool the house based on simple age-old principles of tropical living. The edge of the bio pool is open to the sky and with no mechanical system installed, it is sustained entirely through an understanding of simple ecological and biological systems, a constant experiment that remains fluid, an echo of the defining ethos of the house.

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

This conceptual thread of a return to the basics is continued in the use of materials, where natural recycled materials accent particular elements in the house. For instance, the use of recycled timber is evident in the staircase and the doors, lending a natural patina that coupled with the detailing, reflects the primordial nature of the tropical dwelling unit.

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

The arrangement of the domestic spaces are subverted, with the ground floor anchored by a gallery space and the use of split levels linked with a central open vertical circulation core of lightly articulated staircases and ramps. This opens up the spaces while providing endless opportunities for an interesting dialogue between the programmatic spaces.

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

The openness in both plan and design articulation brings forth the intention to modulate between the interior and exterior, where the diurnal extremities of the tropical outdoors and what makes a comfortable dwelling space is deftly moderated with respect for both basic ecological principles and sustainable tropical living methods. The house in its openness embraces the heat and humidity of the tropics, celebrating the climatic eccentricities in multiple layers while at the same time carefully keeping in balance with the requirements that come with its function as a domestic space in the city, drawing out delight in the choreography of the spaces within.

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

Image Courtesy © Albert Lim

Image Courtesy © Zarch Collaboratives

Image Courtesy © Zarch Collaboratives

Image Courtesy © Zarch Collaboratives

Image Courtesy © Zarch Collaboratives

Image Courtesy © Zarch Collaboratives

Image Courtesy © Zarch Collaboratives

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Category: House

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