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Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal loves modern architecture. He comes from a family of builders who have built more than 20 projects in the last ten years near Delhi in India. He has recently started writing about the architectural projects that catch his imagination.

The museum garden at the National Gallery of Art in Copenhagen, Denmark by POLYFORM

 
November 14th, 2014 by Sumit Singhal

Article source: POLYFORM 

The new landscape in front of The National Gallery of Denmark is designed as a melting pot – where art can mix with urban life. The urban space is created by Danish POLYFORM Architects and Dutch landscape architects Karres en Brands and has received a warm welcome from the Copenhageners. At the opening event the museum set a new visitor record as almost 8.000 people celebrated the city’s new artsy urban space.

Courtesy © Wichmann+Bendtsen

Courtesy © Wichmann+Bendtsen

  • Architects: POLYFORM
  • Project: The museum garden at the National Gallery of Art
  • Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Photography: Wichmann+Bendtsen, Helle Kristiansen
  • Software used: Autocad and for renderings Photoshop, Rhino and Illustrator.
  • Client: The National Gallery of Denmark/ City of Copenhagen/ Annie og Otto Johs. Detlefs Foundation
  • Area: 10.000 square meters
  • Budget: 2,7 million euros
  • Team: Thomas Kock, Jonas Sangberg, Sylvia Karres, Bart Brands, Signe Hertzum, Nikolaj Frølund Thomsen, Henrik Thomas Faurskov, Sofie Mandrup, Sofia Bergman, Tomas Degenaar, Elke Krausmann, Sander Vedder, Marianne Weeke Borup og Julie Thorsø Hansen

Courtesy © Wichmann+Bendtsen

Courtesy © Wichmann+Bendtsen

POLYFORM partner Thomas Kock explains how the urban space is designed to be accessible and welcoming to everyone: “This garden is meant for both the museum and the city – its embracing design obviously gives an easy accessible entry to the arts, but it also gives the general public a new green urban space to meet up in, the option to sit down by the fountain and maybe enjoy art happenings and events.” Thomas Kock also underlines that the new urban space is the exact opposite of the previous baroque-inspired garden and it’s strict, closed off design: “Today soft round islands of grass and winding pathways invites you into a landscape that is open day and night. We wanted to allow lots of space so the art could float out of the museum and into the garden – and in this way making it a melting pot for art and the city life.” concludes Thomas Kock.

Courtesy © Wichmann+Bendtsen

Courtesy © Wichmann+Bendtsen

The goal of letting art meet urban life was seemingly achieved already at the opening of the garden as a mixed crowd of thousands enjoyed the last sunny day of an Indian summer. The art crowd was mingling at the foot of the museum stairs, hip youngsters were drinking draft beer on the grass and seniors and parents enjoyed the sight of kids playing with boats and bathing in the water fountain.

Courtesy © Wichmann+Bendtsen

Courtesy © Wichmann+Bendtsen

The great water basin in the middle of the garden is a natural hang out and gathering point. The fascination and attraction of water draws people in and the wide edge of the basin invites them to sit down. But according to Thomas Kock the basin is designed for much more: “Its multifunctional. On a normal day the basin will serve as a water mirror, which pulls the city’s towers into the garden and thereby brings the city and the museum closer together. But emptied the basin can also serve as a platform for art installations, concerts, performance art or as an ice skating rink.” And Thomas Kock continues, “With a diameter of 105 feet the basin can facilitate a wide variety of creative expression.”

Image Courtesy © Helle Kristiansen

Image Courtesy © Helle Kristiansen

The Danish Minister of Culture Marianne Jelved inaugurated the museum garden at The National Gallery of Denmark on September 19th 2014. The garden is always open for visitors.

Image Courtesy © Helle Kristiansen

Image Courtesy © Helle Kristiansen

Fun facts about the new museum garden:

The garden water fountain is made of 32 specially designed curvy concrete components weighing up to 8 tonnes each.

The depth of the basin is measured so kids (and adults) can play with model boats.

A beloved part of the former baroque-inspired garden was the lilac bushes. For this reason 318 lilac bushes will be planted in the new garden. The lightning fixtures of the previous garden are reused in the new garden as well.

The garden has moveable green chairs, which allows visitors to move them around and sit exactly where they want.

Image Courtesy © POLYFORM

Image Courtesy © POLYFORM

Image Courtesy © POLYFORM

Image Courtesy © POLYFORM

Image Courtesy © POLYFORM

Image Courtesy © POLYFORM

Image Courtesy © POLYFORM

Image Courtesy © POLYFORM

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Categories: Autocad, Illustrator, Museum, Photoshop, Rhino

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