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Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal loves modern architecture. He comes from a family of builders who have built more than 20 projects in the last ten years near Delhi in India. He has recently started writing about the architectural projects that catch his imagination.

Casa Narigua in El Jonuco, Mexico by P+0 architecture

 
April 9th, 2015 by Sumit Singhal

Article source: P+0 architecture

We find Narigua House in “El Jonuco” a beautiful place where we enjoy from 360º of spectacular views. This mountain-enclosed neighborhood reminds us of numerous mexican towns where tall mountains limit the valley where its inhabitants settle.

Here, its residents live alongside with the typical vegetation and wildlife found in northern México.

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

  • Architects: P+0 architecture (David Pedroza Castañeda)
  • Project: Casa Narigua
  • Location: El Jonuco, Mexico
  • Project: May 2011- September 2013
  • Area: 7875 sqm
  • Construction: Paralelo. Arturo Barbosa, Hyaell Briones, Beatriz Chavez.
  • Structural Engineering: Emilio Gonzalez Saucedo
  • Construction supervision phase 1: Punto 3. Jesus González, Diego Gonzalez.
  • Collaborators interior design: Adriana Guisa, Oswaldo Salazar
Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

  • CONCRETE STRUCTURE: CEMEX
    • Colored Concrete
    • Gray Concrete
  • OTHER CONCRETE COMPONENTS: CEMEX
    • Water Block: Colored waterproof Concrete
    • Pool: Gray waterproof concrete as exterior finish.
    • Washbasins: Gray waterproof concrete as exterior finish.
    • Flooring: Colored and gray polished concrete floors
Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

  • WOODEN STRUCTURE: Sergio Durazo
    • Mexican Cypress beams. 8” x 12” x 20’
    • Mexican Cypress tiles
  • WOODEN FLOORS: Duelparquet
    • Interior: mesquite hardwood floors.
    • Exterior: Teakwood deck
  • CARPENTRY: Victor Loza
    • Teakwood and Mesquite Doors
    • Tzalam Furniture
Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

  • WINDOWS: Fenster Design Aluminium
    • Double glass floor to celing windows
    • Double glass sliding windows
  • FURNITURE:
    • BGP Arquitectura: Java (Chair), Tuvana (Table and bench), Sula (Chaiselonge), IA (Chair).
    • Roche Bobois: Syntaxe Sofa.
    • Riva 1920: Maui Armchair
    • Dupuis: “Sanmiguelito”  Chair
Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

  • ART:
    • Sculpture: Heads: Mauricio Cortés, Chair: Fernando Pereznieto
    • Paintings:  Alejandra Villegas, Guillermo Olguín
  • RECONOCIMIENTOS
    • XIII Bienal de Arquitectura Mexicana, Medalla de plata (1er lugar Residencia Unifamiliar). San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas, Mx. Noviembre 2014.
    • XXIII Premio Obras Cemex, Primer Lugar Residencia Unifamiliar, México D.F. Mx. Noviembre 2014
    • Premio Obra del Año, Categoria Residencial. México D.F. Mx. Octubre 2014
    • WAN House of the Year Awards, Finalista, Londres, In. Octubre 2014
    • World Architecture Festival Awards, Finalista, Singapur, Sn. Octubre 2014
    • XVII Bienal de Arquitectura 2013 CANL, Mención Honorífica, Monterrey, N.L. Mx. Octubre 2013.
Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

The site is densely populated by local trees that pose a serious design challenge: A house that enjoys the view of the mountains while respecting the existing ecosystem.

Because of the horizontal growt of the cedar trees that block the view, a “forest of columns” is not an option. The only possible solution is to lift the house and make it fly above the tree tops.

A mild slope road reaches the ground floor, 10m above the road, where all the esencial spaces are located.

To preserve the existing greenery the floorplan is divided into zones that get around a group of old cedar trees.

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Because each level responds to different conditions each plan, in itself simple, is different to the others.

The building is divided in three different volumes. The first one contains the garage and storage spaces. The entrance hall, master bedroom and the staircase to the lower level are located in the second volume while the third volume contains the kitchen, service and social areas.

Outdoor life ocurrs on the west side of the house in a group of terraces that overlook the focal point of the residence: two spectacular mountains that almost touch.

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

The lower level serves as a plinth for the ground floor and contains a number of “recyclable” chambers with furniture that allows them to transform into the guest bedrooms.

This floor also contains two half-buried technical rooms that free the rooftop to enjoy an enormous belvedere surrounded completely by the landscape.

Contrary to its massive exterior image, inside the house the transparency of the glass makes the exterior views part of everyday life. Windows dialogue with thick walls, flat roofs and the timber beams we find in traditional mexican architecture.

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

The material palette gives the project a rustic, timeless appearance that serves as background for various objects. Antiques live alongside with contemporary furniture while the parallel world of paintings, masks and sculptures claim our attention. The house’s treasures allure our eyes to stay inside before escaping to the natural scenario on the other side of the glass.

The different elements of the program, placed in a juxtaposition of volumes define the complex image that emerges from a simple distribution.

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

The colored walls and enormous floor to ceiling windows reflect the landscape and make the house dissappear. When seen from a distance it is easy to mistake Narigua for a geological accident.

The roads and walls are paved with the stones of the land and the colors of its dirt, its form contrasts with the mountains and trees. Narigua house is a stone work humbly  placed in an impressive landscape.

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

Image Courtesy © P+0 architecture

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