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Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal loves modern architecture. He comes from a family of builders who have built more than 20 projects in the last ten years near Delhi in India. He has recently started writing about the architectural projects that catch his imagination.

Cloaked in Bricks in Tehran, Iran by Admun Design & Construction Studio

 
October 24th, 2015 by Sumit Singhal

Article source: Admun Design & Construction Studio

During the last decades there has been a major shift in architectural patterns in Iran especially in overpopulated urban areas. The old architectural patterns were originated from cultural and religious belief of the residents.

Image Courtesy © Mostafa Karbasi

Image Courtesy © Mostafa Karbasi

  • Architects: Admun Design & Construction Studio
  • Project: Cloaked in Bricks
  • Location: Ekbatan, Tehran, Iran
  • Photography: Parham Taghioff, Mostafa Karbasi
  • Client: Davood Eskandari
  • Architects in Charge: Shobeir Mousavi, Amir Reza Fazel
  • Design Team: Ramtin Haghnazar, Mohsen Fayazbakhsh, Marjan Rafighi, Bita Latifi
  • Project Team: Ali Reza Fazel, Majid Rahmati, Bahareh Ahmadnia
  • Presentation Team: Mostafa Karbasi, Niousha Ghasem
  • Area: 1100 sqm
Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

  • Project Year: 2015
  • Construction: Admun Design & Construction Studio
  • Project Management: Shobeir Mousavi, Amir Reza Fazel
  • Construction Team: Mehdi Mousavi, Javad Shirmohammadi, Mohsen Hosseini, Arash Askari, Mir Ali Shafiei, Ahmad Esmaeel Zade
  • Facade Structural Consultant: Jalal Salehi
  • Mechanical Design: Sassan Alavinejad
  • Electrical Design: Shahrouz Jafari
Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

A key characteristic of Iranian vernacular residential architecture was providing privacy for the residents; however these criteria have been overlooked by contemporary architecture.

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

The design team faced several challenges; the structure was constructed by another team before we were commissioned the job and the strict building codes in Tehran were an issue.

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

To provide maximum privacy yet fulfilling other features such as moderating light, limiting view from outside, organizing chaotic experience of the terraces and decreasing high-traffic neighborhood noise, the solution seemed to be covering the architectural mass in a grid of openings. Brick appeared to be a proper choice since it has always been used as a local building material in Iran meeting environmental needs while creating numerous aesthetically beautiful textures.

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

The concept for the façade is inspired from the surrounding neighborhood fabric. The brick texture is a reflection of the context’s chaotic skyline and the openings are located considering the pleasant and unpleasant neighborhood views.

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Rotating the bricks provided the opportunity to have various degrees of openings and the  rotation angles are precisely adjusted through a dialogue between inside and outside considering sun direction, daylight and level of distraction from the across apartments. Despite the complex form of the facade the construction process was easily executable by workers through simple instructions prepared by employing a system of coding.

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

The design was an attempt to propose a prototype addressing the current issues of residential architecture in its region through bridging between old and new, proving how local materials and patterns can be used in new ways.

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Parham Taghioff

Image Courtesy © Admun Design & Construction Studio

Image Courtesy © Admun Design & Construction Studio

Image Courtesy © Admun Design & Construction Studio

Image Courtesy © Admun Design & Construction Studio

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Category: Residential

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