Open side-bar Menu
 ArchShowcase
Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal loves modern architecture. He comes from a family of builders who have built more than 20 projects in the last ten years near Delhi in India. He has recently started writing about the architectural projects that catch his imagination.

Lantern Hotel in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia by zlgdesign

 
May 17th, 2016 by Sumit Singhal

Article source: zlgdesign

The design process for The Lantern Hotel project started in 2012 with long periods of time to get the building facade approval from the authorities, getting the client to confirm room numbers and room layout, going over and over the design, looking at different options and doing continuously cost-cutting exercises to maximize cost and profit for the client, achieving 49 guest rooms, all with attached bathroom, 2 dorms with each 6 beds and external bathroom, facilities for breakfast, centralized computer area, locker area and an outdoor terrace for a total project cost of only 4.2mil including furnishing.

Daytime view of the facade, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Daytime view of the facade, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography 

  • Architects: zlgdesign
  • Project: Lantern Hotel
  • Location: 1-8 Bangunan Perdagangan D7, 800 Jalan Sentul 51000, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
  • Photography: Staek Photography
  • Software used: Autocad, Sketch up
  • Client: TCL Hotel & Properties Sdn Bhd
  • Civil Engineer: KNK Consult Sdn Bhd
  • M & E Engineer: BSD Consult
  • Floor Area: 2850 m2
  • Date of Completion: March 2015

Daytime view of the facade, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Daytime view of the facade, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Sadly so, the existing shop houses at this site were demolished and were replaced with a monstrous huge building block of 5 levels, with no regards to the surrounding or the Malaysian heritage. Hong Leong Bank operating at the first 2 levels with 3 floors above which were empty over the last few years, was most recently used as a stationary/ bookstore as far as we know.

Night view of the façade, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Night view of the façade, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Façade detail of MS steel plate framing with timber shutters, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Façade detail of MS steel plate framing with timber shutters, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

We were faced on one hand with an ‘out-of-proportion’ existing building mass, and to satisfy client’s brief to maximize the space for as many rooms as possible for the minimum budget possible; At the same time, try to design a hotel in which guests would feel good and respond to the surrounding, partially [most already destroyed] heritage and history of Petaling Street in the most sensitive and empathic way possible.

Façade, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Façade, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Façade, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Façade, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

The construction phase alone faced a lot of constrains and hurdles. Hong Leong Bank operating in the first 2 floors, along with the hawker shops at the ground floor could not be disturbed or interrupted, which put a challenge for the contractors and the site logistic.

Apart from this, this renovation is our client’s first development, [coming from ‘packing meat’ business] being the QS, having no main contractor on board, dealing with all the different trades and contractors directly and wanting to run the hotel on their own.

Guestroom with glass box , Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Guestroom with glass box , Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

View towards skylight from level 2, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

View towards skylight from level 2, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Throughout the whole design process our challenge was not to lose track of our initial idea to create a central void/ courtyard space. We also wanted to introduce natural light into all floors, face all the guest rooms internally and place the main corridor along the outer facade instead for guests to experience views out [either through the new clay brick walls with openings or through the timber shutters on their way to their rooms].

Corridor, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Corridor, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Ground floor foyer area, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Ground floor foyer area, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

We wanted the facade to be less obtrusive and to melt harmoniously with the hustle and bustle of the surroundings. We decided on locally manufactured, dark brown clay bricks from Johor Bahru and we studied different laying methods to allow for sufficient opening and laid the bricks in a manner to give a ‘3 dimensional’ texture to the facade.

Corridor, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Corridor, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Reception/ breakfast counter/ computer station area, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Reception/ breakfast counter/ computer station area, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

We removed the existing windows and added a new facade on top of the exiting wall whereby we either added timber louver shutter windows at the existing openings or we carried the clay brick wall throughout the opening. The openings for the timber shutter/edges of the clay brick walls are ‘framed’ by 10mm thick MS steel plates in micaceous ion oxid finish and steel rod function as tie -backs are added for additional safety.

Main entrance staircase, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Main entrance staircase, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Guestroom with attached washroom, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Guestroom with attached washroom, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

By demolishing the slabs, the existing beams are exposed and together with the cantilever glass boxes, they create an animated and dynamic play in the void-space. We emphasized these beams with their existing cored openings by adding lighting inside the openings and painting two inner sides in orange and the other 2 sides in green which gives a colored glow at night.

Guestroom green color  scheme, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Guestroom green color scheme, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

View from level 2, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

View from level 2, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

The color scheme of green and orange is carried through the rooms whereby one side of the void has green curtains and the other side has orange. It goes the same with one wall inside the rooms, one side either has orange or green blending with the curtain or in the fabric of the chairs sitting inside the glass boxes.

We soften the edge of the void space with plants/creepers placing hot dip galvanized planters with steel rods instead of railing at the corridor facing the void and designed concrete planter boxes on the roof to allow plants to creep below the skylight along horizontal steel rods adding shading from the sun once matured.

Guestroom green color  scheme, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Guestroom green color scheme, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Guestroom orange color  scheme, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Guestroom orange color scheme, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

To add more texture and materiality inside the corridor and staircase we removed some of the plaster and exposed the existing bricks. The existing concrete floor in the corridor area is just polished with some added color giving it a warm and lively patina/texture. The void between entrance staircase and the facade was previously boxed up and enclosed and no natural light could penetrate into the staircase area. We opened it up, created a void staircase area. We opened it up, created a void where the natural light passing through the clay brick facade can flow into the space.

Building façade before renovation, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Building façade before renovation, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

“open” floor plan before renovation, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

“open” floor plan before renovation, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Being an open plan before, all walls for the guest rooms were added using concrete blocks, painted only. All rooms are facing the inner courtyard with some rooms having a glass box intruding into the void, a full height window or a lanai area at the long side facade at level 2 with a view towards Petaling Street. All rooms, except the dorms, have attached bathroom in mosaic tile finish, a small niche painted in orange or green with a solid timber top, a bamboo ladder fixed to wall for towels or cloth hanger. All rooms have specially-made timber bed frame not touching the floor and the dorm has double high bed design with plywood timber wall backing. Being very small rooms ranging between 12 sqm-18 sqm, we added a centralized space for lockers in all corridors using the same timber louver design concept like the facade for the locker doors.

Clay brick wall, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Clay brick wall, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

New clay brick wall  with framing in white lime wash finish and removed plaster at existing wall, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

New clay brick wall with framing in white lime wash finish and removed plaster at existing wall, Image Courtesy © Staek Photography

Having the reception on level 2, we highlighted the main entrance at ground floor with a red pendant lantern ceiling facing the main entrance door. Upon entrance, we designed a small foyer waiting area with a fixed concrete/ plywood bench before stepping up to the reception area at the 2nd floor. This floor has 15 guest rooms and all the basic public amenities like reception/ bar/counter, charcoal pant/magnetic wall for notes and information, a computer counter area, a simple plywood shelf and tables/ chairs inside the courtyard.  These tables and chairs are to be used for morning breakfast, and meet ups. From this level, a steel/timber staircase leads you to the outdoor terrace overlooking Petaling Street. The next 2 floors above are typical floors with each 16 rooms + 1 dorm.

We hope this building will evoke associations, memories and a glimpse idea of what might have been at this specific site before, reminding us of the rich historical past and heritage throughout many places in Malaysia and South East Asia.

Floor Plan Level 2, Image Courtesy © zlgdesign

Floor Plan Level 2, Image Courtesy © zlgdesign

Typical Floor Plan , Image Courtesy © zlgdesign

Typical Floor Plan , Image Courtesy © zlgdesign

 Existing/ new clay bricks wall  section detail, Image Courtesy © zlgdesign

Existing/ new clay bricks wall section detail, Image Courtesy © zlgdesign

Façade/ timber shutter plan and section, Image Courtesy © zlgdesign

Façade/ timber shutter plan and section, Image Courtesy © zlgdesign

Related posts:

Contact zlgdesign

Tags: ,

Categories: Autocad, Hotel, sketch up

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

GRAPHISOFT: ARCHICAD download 30-day FREE trial
Graphisoft ARCHICAD  Download a 30-Day FREE trial
TurboCAD pro : Start at $299
CADalog.com - Countless CAD add-ons, plug-ins and more.



Internet Business Systems © 2016 Internet Business Systems, Inc.
595 Millich Dr., Suite 216, Campbell, CA 95008
+1 (408)-337-6870 — Contact Us, or visit our other sites:
TechJobsCafe - Technical Jobs and Resumes EDACafe - Electronic Design Automation GISCafe - Geographical Information Services  MCADCafe - Mechanical Design and Engineering ShareCG - Share Computer Graphic (CG) Animation, 3D Art and 3D Models
  Privacy Policy