Open side-bar Menu

Author Archive

28 POSTI RESTAURANT in Navigli, Italy by Francesco Faccin

Thursday, August 1st, 2013

Article source: Francesco Faccin

The place is intimate and welcoming, only 28 seats. It is located in a quiet and private street in the heart of the Navigli’s area, and it has taken the place of the historical Karaoke CantaMilano. The architectural project aimed to bring the room to its original state with the incorporation of new furniture elements produced internally with recycled materials.

Image Courtesy © Filippo Romano

  • Architects: Francesco Faccin
  • Project: 28 POSTI RESTAURANT
  • Location: Navigli, Italy
  • Bollate LAB: Liveinslums + Francesco Faccin
  • Responsible educators of the project: Catia Bianchi – Matilde Napoleone
  • Image Coordinator: Claude Marzotto
  • Chef: Caterina Malerba
  • Manager: Antonino Toscano

Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard Madrid, Spain by Olalquiaga Arquitectos

Thursday, August 1st, 2013

Article source: Olalquiaga Arquitectos

The housing development in Vallecas is the main urban planning development in Madrid today. It is almost completely organised in a homogenous pattern of closed square blocks of 75 meters a side. The plot for the competition occupies three thirds of such a block.

Image Courtesy © Miguel de Guzmán

  • Architects: Olalquiaga Arquitectos
  • Project: Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard
  • Location: Madrid, Spain
  • Photography: Miguel de Guzmán, Olalquiaga Arquitectos
  • Client: Empresa Municipal de la Vivienda y Suelo de Madrid (EMVS)
  • Team: Javier Morales Luchena(arquitecto), Jesús Resino (maqueta), Luis Cristóbal (fotografía maqueta)
  • Civil engineer: Arquing (Luis Casas)
  • Mechanical engineer: JG Ingenieros (Emilio González Gaya, Julián Mingo,Roberto Fernándezy María Teresa Píriz)
  • Quantity surveyor: Manuel LópezLara
  • Installation “Yesterday i had a dream”: Lavadora creativa (Marta Mora y Mauro Bonillo.
  • Colaborador: Alberto Billi

FIRST PEOPLES HOUSE in British Columbia, Canada by Formline Architecture + Urbanism

Thursday, August 1st, 2013

Article source: Formline Architecture + Urbanism

Located at the University of Victoria on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada this building was designed to accommodate the Indigenous Graduate Student Union.  The House aspires to be a welcoming home for Aboriginal students and an inclusive and healing place for the local and global Indigenous community and non-Indigenous people alike.

View of Main Entrance with concrete totem for 100% natural air intake, Image Courtesy © Nick Lehoux

  • Architects: Formline Architecture + Urbanism
  • Location: British Columbia, Canada
  • Photography: Nick Lehoux
  • Type: Institutional, Post Secondary, Cultural
  • Building Status: Completed 2009
  • Site Area: 1.42 acre
  • Building Area: 1,196 sm  (12,875 sft)
  • Software used: Autocad
  • CLIENT: University of Victoria
  • PROJECT MANAGER: Larry Wilkinson, Facilities Managemen

View of main public corridor with wall for displaying art, Image Courtesy © Nick Lehoux


  • Structural Engineers: Equilibrium Consulting
  • Mechanical Engineer: Hershfield Williams Timmins
  • Electrical Engineer: Advanced Engineering Solutions
  • Civil Engineer: Stantec


  • Building Envelope: Morrison Hershfield
  • Landscape Architect: Vaughn Landscape Planning & Design
  • Code Consultant: Pioneer Consultants
  • LEED Consultant: Kane Consulting
  • Art Coordinator: John Livingston

Ceremonial Hall clad in woven cedar with fireplace with concealed air intake and exhaust below floor, Image Courtesy © Nick Lehoux

The building is comprised of classrooms, offices, study spaces, ceremonial space and lounges for elders and students. The design of the building is inspired aesthetically and philosophically from the indigenous Coast Salish culture. The First Peoples House embodies traditional Coast Salish building principlesin its’ ability to mediate the environment, maximize sunlight, ventilation, natural resources and local materials.

Ceremonial East Entrance with house posts carved by local Coast Salish artist, Image Courtesy © Nick Lehoux

The post-and-beam Douglas Fir glulam structure, inspired by the Coast Salish longhouse, has primary components clad in Clear A 1×10 & 2×10 clear edge grain western red cedar. The cedar is salvaged logs from the northwest coast of Vancouver Island by the Dididat Nation. The building is broken into 3 discrete elements (classrooms, Ceremonial Hall, administration) connected by glazed curtain wall. The upper roof drains all water into a storm water retention pond and the lower roof is planted with indigenous grasses.

View of North elevation with newly planted indigenous garden and planted roof on lower building, Image Courtesy © Nick Lehoux

The building is passively cooled and reduces energy by use of a low velocity displacement ventilation system. This sustainable approach is inspired from the Coastal Salish Long house which had a smoke vent at the top and perimeter cedar planks at the bottom of the walls were raised to allow a low level draft for the fire pit. Modeled on this system a combination of user controlled and DDC control operable windows and vents surround the building.

West entrance, view of rammed-earth-wall and waterfall scupper, Image Courtesy © Nick Lehoux

One 100% outdoor Air Handling unit serves heating and ventilation requirements and feeds air below the floor at the perimeter of the building.  Heating is supplied by the University central heat main system.  Stratification moves air through offset acoustic louvres into the corridor where it is returned to the ventilation unit or exhausted through DDC controlled windows at the highest point in the building.

Image Courtesy © Formline Architecture + Urbanism

Art is integral to First Nations culture and this project incorporates carved western red cedar house posts, carved ceremonial doors and eight carved panels in its Ceremonial Hall. Woven cedar panels line the Hall walls and are inspired by the bull rush mats traditionally found in long house interiors to break the draft.

Image Courtesy © Formline Architecture + Urbanism

The site design incorporates existing footpaths, supplemented with the reintroduction of low-maintenance indigenous plants, waterfall and storm-water retention pond.  All these natural features contribute to building’s overall calming and magnificent presence. The project received LEED Gold certification in 2011.

Image Courtesy © Formline Architecture + Urbanism

Image Courtesy © Formline Architecture + Urbanism

New holding offices Humanitas in Rozzano, Milan by Filippo Taidelli Architetto

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

Article source: Filippo Taidelli Architetto

The project foresees the renovation of an existing building in disuse within the hospital complex of the Humanitas Institute in Rozzano (just outside of Milan) that will serve as the new headquarters and landmark symbol of the Humanitas group.
The volume presented itself as a parallelepiped structure balanced on the border of the existing building’s roof without a direct connection to the main building.

Image Courtesy © Filippo Taidelli Architetto

CASA LORENZO in Gorráiz, Navarra, SPAIN by Juan M. Otxotorena

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

Article source: Juan M. Otxotorena

The plot of an almost rectangular shape has an approximate size of 15 meters wide by 29 meters long, with a Northeast-Southeast orientation in its longest axis. Its upper part runs alongside an access road, and its bottom part with another on which there is a rising slope, defined in the first section by means of a talus; the other parts adjoin similar plots. It belongs to a series of closely built houses, with very little space between them: it is part of a series of consecutive, adjacent plots of similar characteristics which, as a group, are one of the building developments of the Castillo de Gorraiz housing estate very near to the city of Pamplona.

Image Courtesy © Pedro Pegenaute

  • Architects: Juan M. Otxotorena
  • Project:CASA LORENZO
  • Location: Gorráiz, Navarra, SPAIN
  • Photography: Pedro Pegenaute
  • Collaborators architects: Gloria Herrera, Juan José Peralta
  • Construction area: 446,20 m2
  • Date: 2008

The Cliff in Copenhagen, Denmark by Mangor & Nagel ARKITEKTFIRMA

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

Article source: Mangor & Nagel ARKITEKTFIRMA


”The Cliff” is an indoor public swimming bath in the Danish region Stevns. The architecture of the building is inspired by the cliffs of Stevns, Northern Europe’s most important geological locality. It is based on the transition between the landscape and the village, and the building rises steadily and proudly from the landscape in the east towards the buildings in the west. At the top end of the sloped roof, the white wall abruptly finishes the sculpture, and the furrowed front of the building and the window openings together illustrate how the facade is inspired by the chalk layers of the natural cliffs. A cut in the facade opens up the building to the landscape and allows the light to flood into it, while the white plaster facade fits the local white washed buildings.

Image Courtesy © Tom Jersøe

  • Architects: Mangor & Nagel ARKITEKTFIRMA
  • Project: The Cliff
  • Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Photography: Tom Jersøe
  • Building project: Indoor public swimming bath in Stevns, Denmark
  • Area: 2000 sqm
  • Year: 2012
  • Project type: Competition
  • Client: Stevns Municipality
  • Engineering: Alectia
  • Water treatment: TeknologiskInstitut
  • Building contractor: MT Højgaard A/S

Shrine of the Virgin of ‘La Antigua’ in La Rioja, Spain by Otxotorena Arquitectos

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

Article source: Otxotorena Arquitectos

The site corresponds to a plot on the outskirts of the town of Alberite. This is a 2.000 people village, very close to Logroño in La Rioja, Spain. The place is located on a gentle hill, overlooking a ravine opened into the road running through it. This was a plot of land given to the Parish by the Town Council for the construction of the shrine of the Virgin.

Image Courtesy © Pedro Pegenaute

  • Architects: Otxotorena Arquitectos
  • Project: Shrine of the Virgin of ‘La Antigua’
  • Location: La Rioja, Spain
  • Photography: Pedro Pegenaute
  • Architect and construction management: Juan M. Otxotorena
  • Collaborators architects: Andrés Ayesa, Carlos Díaz
  • Quantity surveyors: Isabelino Río
  • Structure engineering: Fernando Sarría
  • Promoter: Parroquia de San Martín de Alberite
  • Construction company: José Luis Sáenz Ausejo
  • Construction area: 122,50 m2
  • Budget: 240.000 €
  • Date: January 2009

Knowledge Centre, St. Olavs Hospital in Trondheim, Norway

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

Article source: Nordic – Office of Architecture

The Knowledge Centre at St. Olav’s Hospital in Trondheim completes the overall scheme for the hospital grounds that has been on-going since the design competition in 1995, and is centrally located in the heart of the development. Designed with a strong emphasis on functionality and usability, the Knowledge Centre will provide facilities for both St. Olav’s Hospital and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

Image Courtesy © Espen Gr¢nli, Passive facade with integrated artwork

  • Architects: Nordic – Office of Architecture in collaboration with Ratio Arkitekter AS
  • Project: Knowledge Centre, St. Olavs Hospital
  • Location: Trondheim, Norway
  • Photography: Jiri Havran, Espen Gr¢nli, Nordic

Belvedere in Sasebo, Japan by MOVEDESIGN

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

Article source: MOVEDESIGN

This house is located on a small hill in the city  Sasebo, Japan. The concept is to fully display the potential of this site that we can look over 360°. This building is considering how to divide the spaces making changes with a relationship between inside and outside.

Image Courtesy © MOVEDESIGN

  • Architects: MOVEDESIGN
  • Project: Belvedere
  • Location: Sasebo, Japan
  • Photography: Yosuke Harigane
  • Function: private house
  • Structure: wood frame
  • Site area: 761.16㎡
  • Architectural area: 106.50㎡
  • 1F floor area: 104.95㎡
  • 2F floor area: 43.88㎡
  • Total floor area: 148.83㎡
  • Year: 2012

FAI-FAH in Bangkok, Thailand by Spark

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

Article source: Spark

Fai-Fah, which means “light energy”, is a corporate social responsibility (CSR) programme initiated in April 2010 by TMB Bank. The programme acts as a catalyst for change in Thai society through working with underprivileged children and teenagers in their community using the arts as a vehicle for self-development and creative thinking.

Fai-Fah lights up in the evening, Image Courtesy © Lin Ho

  • Architects: Spark
  • Project: FAI-FAH
  • Location: Bangkok, Thailand
  • Photography: Lin Ho
  • Design Director: Stephen Pimbley
  • Team: Wenhui Lim, Mark Mancenido, Suchon Pongsopitsin
  • Client: TMB Bank Public Company Limited
  • Client Team: Paradai Theerathada, Sakchai Sriwatthanapitikul, Nopawan Saengteerakij, Thatchakorn Prutnoppadol, Mallika Uswachoke, Radomdej Taksana, Aree Vesvijak, Jumpol Kwangosen, Saranyoo Nantanawanit, Siriporn Lerdapirangsi
  • Fai-Fah Kids: Master Thanakan Namunmong, Chisanu Kiatsuranayon, Sirinart Naksombhob, Kamolthat Sutat Na Ayudhya
  • Local Architect: 365COOP Company Limited

Project Data

  • GFA (area above ground): 569 sqm
  • Project Completion: Quarter 1, 2012
  • Facilities: Event Space (Living Room), Gallery, Library, Art Studio, Dance Studio, Roof garden
GRAPHISOFT: ARCHICAD download 30-day FREE trial
TurboCAD pro : Start at $299 - Countless CAD add-ons, plug-ins and more.

Internet Business Systems © 2016 Internet Business Systems, Inc.
595 Millich Dr., Suite 216, Campbell, CA 95008
+1 (408)-337-6870 — Contact Us, or visit our other sites:
TechJobsCafe - Technical Jobs and Resumes EDACafe - Electronic Design Automation GISCafe - Geographical Information Services  MCADCafe - Mechanical Design and Engineering ShareCG - Share Computer Graphic (CG) Animation, 3D Art and 3D Models
  Privacy Policy