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Westboro Home in Ottawa, Canada by Kariouk Associates

Saturday, August 10th, 2013

Article source: Kariouk Associates

DESIGN CHALLENGE:

The site for this home was a narrow lot in a downtown neighborhood, which carried with it extensive code limitations on side windows. A further challenge was negotiating the difference in grade between the two neighbouring lots:an already steeply sloping site, the neighbours to the West raised their rear yard an additional 1.5m, ultimately creating a difference in neighbouring lot heights of approximately 2.5m

Image Courtesy © John Kealey

  • Architects: Kariouk Associates
  • Project: Westboro Home
  • Location: Ottawa, Canada
  • Photography: John Kealey
  • DESIGN: Paul duBellet Kariouk (Principal), Chris Davis (Senior Design Associate), Sarah McMurtry (Design Associate), David King (Design Associate)
  • GENERAL CONTRACTOR: Westboro Homes (Nicholas Heins)
  • MILLWORK: Gruber Furniture (Robert Gruber)
  • LANDSCAPE: Empire Enterprises (Brad Beerwort)
  • PROJECT DATES: 2011-2013
  • Software used: Auto-Cad, Sketch-Up and Photoshop

Trish House in Yalding, England by Matthew Heywood

Saturday, August 10th, 2013

Article source: Matthew Heywood

The design of the house developed in direct response to the site and its location within the beautiful village of Yalding in Kent. The building’s structure is composed to reflect the surrounding woodland with the raking columns representing the irregular angles of tree trunks and branches. Large expanses of glass fill the gaps between the structure and allow you to appreciate the landscape and setting as if you were peering out from between the trunks and branches of the trees.

Image Courtesy © Matthew Heywood

  • Architects: Matthew Heywood
  • Project: Trish House Yalding
  • Location: Yalding, Kent, England
  • Engineer: Fothergill & Company
  • Main Contractor: Ecolibrium Solutions
  • Software used: Autocad LT and Rhino 3D

Refurbishment of a patio-house in Gracia, Barcelona (Spain) by Carles Enrich

Wednesday, August 7th, 2013

Article source: Carles Enrich

The conversion of an old dry-cleaning shop between party walls in the Gracia district court into a home-studio for a young family is a fantastic opportunity to rethink the use of an unused place and optimize the conditions.

It is proposed a system to enable the inhabitants to live in an single space arranged around the patio, where the bathroom is the only enclosed piece. All activities take place in a single room with visual contact with the patio. To achieve this, all the partitions that enclosed small rooms with no natural light or ventiliation were removed and the openings were extended to the exterior.

Image Courtesy © Enric Fabre

  • Architects: Carles Enrich
  • Project: Refurbishment of a patio-house
  • Location: Gracia, Barcelona (Spain)
  • Photography: Enric Fabre, Carles Enrich
  • Constructor: CRK.
  • Area: 145 sqm.
  • Year: 2009 – 2013.
  • End date: Febrary 2013

Fagerstrom House in Sollentuna, Sweden by Claesson Koivisto Rune Architects

Tuesday, August 6th, 2013

Article source: Claesson Koivisto Rune Architects

The client had split his garden city plot in two and moved the old house to the one. The other had a more embedded position, including a big old oak tree in the middle.

The gross building allowance had to be fully exploited in order to create a large enough home for the growing family. The stipulated distance to the property line of course limited the positioning from the sides, while the desire to preserve the old oak tree blocked the middle.

Image Courtesy © Claesson Koivisto Rune Architects

  • Architects: Claesson Koivisto Rune Architects
  • Project: Fagerstrom House
  • Location: Sollentuna, Sweden
  • Project group: Mårten Claesson, Eero Koivisto, Ola Rune, Lotti Engstrand
  • Client: Fagerström family
  • Builder: Komponent Byggen AB
  • Construction: Wood
  • Building area: 270 m2
  • Built: 2012

House in Nanakuma, Fukuoka, Japan by MOVEDESIGN

Tuesday, August 6th, 2013

Article source: MOVEDESIGN

This house is located in Fukuoka, Japan. Reinforced concrete for basement and wood flame for 2 floors on the ground.
3 floors are in layers, different generations of this family live in this layered house.
The individual spaces have continuous so that the family can have private and also feel presence for each other.
The role of this large staircase is a apparatus to connect 3 layers. It takes sun lights and connect the air in the house.

Image Courtesy © Yousuke Harigane

  • Architects: MOVEDESIGN
  • Project: House
  • Location: Nanakuma, Fukuoka, Japan
  • Photography: Yousuke Harigane
  • Function: Private house
  • Structure: Reinforced concrete + wood frame
  • Site area: 126.68㎡
  • Architectural area: 54.64㎡
  • Total floor area: 142.68㎡
  • Year: 2013

Family house in Mseno, Czech Republic by Stempel & Tesar architects

Tuesday, August 6th, 2013

Article source: Stempel & Tesar architects

Amazing view, still just nearby a city town centre in a quiet residential area First impressions: ideal site yet still empty. Despite the low price of steep slope of the terrain does not allow a usual house and repels potential buyers.

Image Courtesy © FOTES

  • Architects: Stempel & Tesar architects
  • Project: Family house in Mseno
  • Location: Mseno, Czech Republic
  • Photography: FOTES
  • Statics Structuralengineer: HH Statics Ltd. – Jan Hora
  • Dodavatel Contractor: Hájek Construction Company Ltd.
  • Design and construction project Completion: 2011-2013
  • Site Plot: 818 m2
  • Area Built-up area: 178 m2
  • Usable area: 113 m2 + (41 m2 terrazzo)
  • Total volume: 735 m3

HDJ86 in Tijuana, Baja California by T38 Studio

Saturday, August 3rd, 2013

Article source: T38 Studio

On a site where we are designing 11 single family homes, HDJ86 is one of the first ones to be finished. Built in Tijuana, we have taken advantage of the increidible construction craft that is available, in which construction workers have worked in both the USA and Mexico, so they can perfectly execute construction techniques used in both countries. Each one of the houses is different and deals with different issues and concerns that we have.

Image Courtesy © Alfredo Zertuche

  • Architects: T38 Studio
  • Project: HDJ86
  • Location: Tijuana, Baja California
  • Photography: Alfredo Zertuche, Pablo Casals-Aguirre, T38 studio
  • Project Team: Oscar González, Sara Díaz, Ana Darice Payan, Alejandro Bustos, Pablo Casals-Aguirre, Alina Castañeda, Joseph Ruiz Tapia.
  • Construction: Taller38
  • Project Year: 2011
  • Site surface: 330 m2
  • Built surface: 310 m2

Aria in Tijuana, Baja California by T38 studio

Thursday, August 1st, 2013

Article source:  T38 studio

Located in a residential neighborhood composed by large single family houses in the city of Tijuana, we did an exercise of densification. Inserting a multifamily project that contains four units on a site intended for one single family home. The hallenge was how to achieve this, without breaking the scale of the context, something that would blend in based on size, but break with the existing typologies of the surrounding sites.

Image Courtesy © Pablo Casals-Aguirre

  • Architects: T38 studio
  • Project: Aria
  • Location: Tijuana, Baja
  • Photography: Pablo Casals-Aguirre
  • Team: Alfonso Medina, Mauricio Kuri, Oscar González, Pablo Casals-Aguirre, Lucía Arroyo, Alina Castañeda, Sara Díaz, Alejandro Bustos.
  • Construction: Taller38
  • Project: 2010-2011
  • Construction: 2011-2012
  • Site surface: 550 m2
  • Built surface: 700 m2

FIRST PEOPLES HOUSE in British Columbia, Canada by Formline Architecture + Urbanism

Thursday, August 1st, 2013

Article source: Formline Architecture + Urbanism

Located at the University of Victoria on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada this building was designed to accommodate the Indigenous Graduate Student Union.  The House aspires to be a welcoming home for Aboriginal students and an inclusive and healing place for the local and global Indigenous community and non-Indigenous people alike.

View of Main Entrance with concrete totem for 100% natural air intake, Image Courtesy © Nick Lehoux

  • Architects: Formline Architecture + Urbanism
  • Project: FIRST PEOPLES HOUSE
  • Location: British Columbia, Canada
  • Photography: Nick Lehoux
  • Type: Institutional, Post Secondary, Cultural
  • Building Status: Completed 2009
  • Site Area: 1.42 acre
  • Building Area: 1,196 sm  (12,875 sft)
  • Software used: Autocad
CLIENT AND ARCHITECTURAL PROJECT TEAM
  • CLIENT: University of Victoria
  • PROJECT MANAGER: Larry Wilkinson, Facilities Managemen

View of main public corridor with wall for displaying art, Image Courtesy © Nick Lehoux

ENGINEERS:

  • Structural Engineers: Equilibrium Consulting
  • Mechanical Engineer: Hershfield Williams Timmins
  • Electrical Engineer: Advanced Engineering Solutions
  • Civil Engineer: Stantec

PROJECT SPECIALISTS AND CONSULTANTS:

  • Building Envelope: Morrison Hershfield
  • Landscape Architect: Vaughn Landscape Planning & Design
  • Code Consultant: Pioneer Consultants
  • LEED Consultant: Kane Consulting
  • Art Coordinator: John Livingston

Ceremonial Hall clad in woven cedar with fireplace with concealed air intake and exhaust below floor, Image Courtesy © Nick Lehoux

The building is comprised of classrooms, offices, study spaces, ceremonial space and lounges for elders and students. The design of the building is inspired aesthetically and philosophically from the indigenous Coast Salish culture. The First Peoples House embodies traditional Coast Salish building principlesin its’ ability to mediate the environment, maximize sunlight, ventilation, natural resources and local materials.

Ceremonial East Entrance with house posts carved by local Coast Salish artist, Image Courtesy © Nick Lehoux

The post-and-beam Douglas Fir glulam structure, inspired by the Coast Salish longhouse, has primary components clad in Clear A 1×10 & 2×10 clear edge grain western red cedar. The cedar is salvaged logs from the northwest coast of Vancouver Island by the Dididat Nation. The building is broken into 3 discrete elements (classrooms, Ceremonial Hall, administration) connected by glazed curtain wall. The upper roof drains all water into a storm water retention pond and the lower roof is planted with indigenous grasses.

View of North elevation with newly planted indigenous garden and planted roof on lower building, Image Courtesy © Nick Lehoux

The building is passively cooled and reduces energy by use of a low velocity displacement ventilation system. This sustainable approach is inspired from the Coastal Salish Long house which had a smoke vent at the top and perimeter cedar planks at the bottom of the walls were raised to allow a low level draft for the fire pit. Modeled on this system a combination of user controlled and DDC control operable windows and vents surround the building.

West entrance, view of rammed-earth-wall and waterfall scupper, Image Courtesy © Nick Lehoux

One 100% outdoor Air Handling unit serves heating and ventilation requirements and feeds air below the floor at the perimeter of the building.  Heating is supplied by the University central heat main system.  Stratification moves air through offset acoustic louvres into the corridor where it is returned to the ventilation unit or exhausted through DDC controlled windows at the highest point in the building.

Image Courtesy © Formline Architecture + Urbanism

Art is integral to First Nations culture and this project incorporates carved western red cedar house posts, carved ceremonial doors and eight carved panels in its Ceremonial Hall. Woven cedar panels line the Hall walls and are inspired by the bull rush mats traditionally found in long house interiors to break the draft.

Image Courtesy © Formline Architecture + Urbanism

The site design incorporates existing footpaths, supplemented with the reintroduction of low-maintenance indigenous plants, waterfall and storm-water retention pond.  All these natural features contribute to building’s overall calming and magnificent presence. The project received LEED Gold certification in 2011.

Image Courtesy © Formline Architecture + Urbanism

Image Courtesy © Formline Architecture + Urbanism

CASA LORENZO in Gorráiz, Navarra, SPAIN by Juan M. Otxotorena

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

Article source: Juan M. Otxotorena

The plot of an almost rectangular shape has an approximate size of 15 meters wide by 29 meters long, with a Northeast-Southeast orientation in its longest axis. Its upper part runs alongside an access road, and its bottom part with another on which there is a rising slope, defined in the first section by means of a talus; the other parts adjoin similar plots. It belongs to a series of closely built houses, with very little space between them: it is part of a series of consecutive, adjacent plots of similar characteristics which, as a group, are one of the building developments of the Castillo de Gorraiz housing estate very near to the city of Pamplona.

Image Courtesy © Pedro Pegenaute

  • Architects: Juan M. Otxotorena
  • Project:CASA LORENZO
  • Location: Gorráiz, Navarra, SPAIN
  • Photography: Pedro Pegenaute
  • Collaborators architects: Gloria Herrera, Juan José Peralta
  • Construction area: 446,20 m2
  • Date: 2008
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