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Archive for the ‘University Building’ Category

Darla Moore School of Business, University in Columbia, South Carolina by Rafael Vinoly Architects

Wednesday, February 6th, 2013

Article source: Rafael Vinoly Architects

Rafael Vinoly Architects is proud to announce that the University South Carolina celebrated the “Topping Out” of the new building for the Darla Moore School of Business in a ceremony today held at the construction site. The Darla Moore School of Business, globally renowned for its international business program, has until now been housed in a 1970s-era building located near the university’s historic Horseshoe, site of the original campus established in 1801. The new building—designed by Rafael Viñoly Architects and commissioned by alumna and namesake Darla Moore through a $70 million donation—will provide an environment well suited to answer the challenges of a 21st century business school.

Image Courtesy Rafael Vinoly Architects  

  • Architects: Rafael Vinoly Architects
  • Project: Darla Moore School of Business, University 
  • Location: Columbia, South Carolina
  • Software used: Rhino and Autocad

Student Housing University of Southern Denmark by C.F. Møller Architects

Sunday, January 27th, 2013

Article source: C.F. Møller Architects

The design of the new student housing for the University of Southern Denmark in Odense is based on a strong community spirit. The 250 student residences are located in three interconnected 14-storey buildings. This means that the residence has no front or back, but appears attractive from a 360-degree perspective. The building’s distinctive shape will make it easily recognizable on the campus, and clearly advertises its distinct residential content.

Image Courtesy C.F. Møller 

  • Architects: C.F. Møller Architects
  • Project: Student Housing University of Southern Denmark
  • Location: Odense, Denmark

Stanford University School of Medicine in Stanford, California by WRNS Studio

Saturday, January 12th, 2013

Article source: WRNS Studio

The Welch Road Translational Research Campus reflects the new vision for the Stanford University School of Medicine to transform the Welch Road properties from a parcel-zoned, suburban land-use to a more integrated, pedestrian-focused campus. The campus is composed of two buildings: The Jill and John Freidenrich Translational Research Center (pictured here) and the CJ Huang Asian Liver Center and Academic Medical Office Building.

Image Courtesy © Bruce Damonte / WRNS Studio

  • Architects: WRNS Studio
  • Project: Stanford University School of Medicine
  • Location: Stanford, California, USA
  • Photography: Bruce Damonte, Tim Maloney

University of District of Columbia Student Center in Washington, DC by Marshall Moya Design

Wednesday, December 5th, 2012

Article source: Marshall Moya Design

Marshall Moya Design in association with Cannon Design worked together to create the new UDC Student Center, with an expected completion in the Fall of 2013. This project incorporates a new ground-floor restaurant, meeting spaces, fitness center, and ballroom, all addressing specific needs of the student community. This blend of public and intimate spaces helps to create a haven for these college students, and cater to community needs. The design provides collaborative spaces that will foster and cultivate student relationships and develop school identity. The building will achieve Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum status, which recognizes designs in buildings that incorporate sustainable green initiatives.

Image Courtesy Marshall Moya Design

  • Architects: Marshall Moya Design
  • Project: University of District of Columbia Student Center
  • Location: Washington, DC


URV In Catalunya, Spain by Col·legi d’Arquitectes de Catalunya

Tuesday, November 20th, 2012

Article source: Col·legi d’Arquitectes de Catalunya

Halfway between the park and the city, the new building brings together several colleges and aims to make possible the transition between the natural and the urban. On the one hand, it can be discovered between the trees as a small fragmented piece allowing an easy integration with the surrounding park. But, on the other hand, it is able to offer a more compact urban façade that binds with the urban topography reaching the usual height of the city.

Image Courtesy Pedro Pegenaute

  • Architects: Col·legi d’Arquitectes de Catalunya
  • Project: URV
  • Location: Avinguda Remolins. Tortosa, Catalunya, Spain
  • Developer: Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV)
  • Authors: Pere Joan Ravetllat, Carme Ribas, Josep Ferrando
  • Architects: Olga Schmid, Aida Español, Tania Oramas, Marc Nadal, Ferran Laguna, Roman Ortega
  • Structural Engineers: NB35
  • M&E Engineers: JG Ingenieros
  • Technical Architects: Toledo-Villarreal A.T.  
  • Site surveyors: Josep Codinas, Xavier Josa (Valeri Consultors)
  • Enterprise executor: Construccions PAI, S.A
  • Project ending: February 2008
  • Construction ending: July 2011
  • Surface: 9.835,80 m²
  • Budget: 7.942.752,93€(PEM)
  • Photographer: Pedro Pegenaute


Admissions Center, Brandeis University in Waltham, MA by Charles Rose Architects Inc.

Tuesday, November 20th, 2012

Article source: Charles Rose Architects Inc.

Sited near the campus entrance, the admissions center is one of the first buildings that visitors see when entering Brandeis. First impressions were important to our clients when we began talks about design. Several questions became the basis of our work: How might the building accommodate large numbers of people and still feel intimate? How could the architecture impress—but not overwhelm—prospective students?

Image Courtesy John Linden

  • Architects: Charles Rose Architects Inc.
  • Project: Admissions Center, Brandeis University
  • Location: Waltham, MA USA
  • Commissioned by: Brandeis University
  • Scope: 24,000 SF gateway building; offers official welcome to prospective students; three waiting areas; 100-seat presentation room; administration offices.
  • Materials: Limestone; bush-hammered concrete; exposed aggregate concrete; stainless steel; aluminum windows; artisan plaster; acoustical plaster; American sycamore paneling.
  • Completed: 2009
  • Cost: $11,500,000
  • Photo Credits: John Linden and Peter Vanderwarker
  • Collaborators:

    • Landscape Architect: Reed Hilderbrand LLC
    • Civil Engineer: Nitsch Engineering
    • Geotechnical Engineer: McPhail Associates, Inc.
    • Structural Engineer: RSE Associates, Inc.
    • Lighting Consultant: PHT Lighting Design Inc.
    • Acoustical & IT Consultant: Acentech Inc.
    • Code Consultant: R.W. Sullivan Engineering


Brock University CFHBRC: Daylighting / Layers of Transparency

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

Article source: Payette

Glass was once a rare and limiting material, used very sparingly in older buildings. Now, with technological advancements in the manufacturing and performance of glass, a building’s entire enclosure can be constructed with glass – and large expanses of glass are often used for interior partitions.

Courtesy of Payette

  • Architects: Payette and architectsAlliance
  • Project: Brock University CFHBRC: Daylighting / Layers of Transparency
  • Software used: ArchiCad and AutoCAD

Courtesy of Payette

For the Brock University Cairns Family Health and Biosciences Research Complex (CFHBRC), a series of glass “layers” allow daylight to penetrate deep into the building. There are also surface treatments on the glass, as well as an exterior screen wall that controls the light entering the building. The various types of glass and screens provide transparency, illumination, light filtration and privacy.

Courtesy of Payette

On the upper two laboratory floors, the continuous wall of transparent glass has a screen-printed pattern applied to it which filters the light and reduces solar heat gain. While a high degree of transparency exists with this technique, the plane of glass clearly defines a boundary and a screen between the interior and exterior of the building.

Courtesy of Payette

Courtesy of Payette

On the south façade, the uninterrupted glass wall has a solar screen 3 feet in front of it, which is an aluminum hexagonal frame supporting a closely spaced series of aluminum rods. The hexagon motif is meant to be symbolic of molecular structure. This screen serves as a “veil” to filter sunlight and control glare, but also exists as a much larger architectural expression of surface. From within the building, the views out through the “screen” are maintained, yet there is a perceived reduction in glare. When viewing the building’s exterior from the south, this screen wall appears to have various degrees of transparency which changes depending on the angle of light and viewing distance. There are moments in time when the wall seems to be almost solid, with a reflective metallic sheen that is reminiscent of a brushed stainless steel. At other times, the screen wall seems as though it is a very light veil, elegantly filtering the light.

Courtesy of Payette

With the two upper floors of laboratory space and faculty offices, the goal was to bring natural light deep into the labs, and to illuminate the main corridor with as much natural daylight as possible. The northern wall of this long corridor is a continuous, floor-to-ceiling acid etched glass wall, which actually presents itself as more of a luminous surface. The borrowed daylight from the offices along the north façade becomes a diffuse glow once it reaches the corridor. By contrast, the southern wall of the corridor is more solid, with entrances into the labs marked by a series of recesses and display boards set within bamboo clad entry portals. The sliding display boards also act to conceal the many electrical panels that line the corridor.

Courtesy of Payette

The write-up desks for the researchers are located in an open office zone along the southern edge of the lab floors. This space is separated from the main laboratory by a fully glazed wall with a series of bamboo clad entry portals, echoing the design of the main corridor lab entrances. Southern light is filtered by the exterior screen wall and allowed to pass through the write-up space and deep into the research labs.

Courtesy of Payette

Brock University celebrated the official grand opening of the CFHBRC with a ribbon cutting ceremony on September 14, 2012. The project is striving for a LEED Silver certification, and has been designed in collaboration with the Toronto based firm architectsAlliance.

Courtesy of Payette

Courtesy of Payette

Courtesy of Payette

Courtesy of Payette

Courtesy of Payette


New Engineering Research, Testing and Education bldg. at University of Alabama in USA by Lord, Aeck & Sargent (LAS)

Thursday, November 8th, 2012

Article Source: Lord, Aeck & Sargent (LAS)

As laboratory architect for the University of Alabama’s (UA) newest building on a growing Science and Engineering Complex, architecture firm Lord, Aeck & Sargent(LAS) was faced with a challenge: program and design 85 highly diverse laboratory spaces in a structure that had to fit within the footprint and site prescribed by a master plan.

The 3,400-square-foot electromechanical systems lab at the University of Alabama’s South Engineering Research Center (SERC). © Jonathan Hillyer / Atlanta

  • Architects: Lord, Aeck & Sargent (LAS) 
  • Project: New Engineering Research, Testing and Education bldg. at University of Alabama
  • Location:  Alabama, USA
  • Photography: Jonathan Hillyer / Atlanta
  • Project Team:
    UA Facilities (Tuscaloosa, Ala.) – Owner’s Representative
    • Davis Architects (Birmingham, Ala. office) – Architect-of-Record
    • Lord, Aeck & Sargent (Atlanta office) – Laboratory Architect
    • Whitaker & Rawson (Birmingham, Ala.) – MP/FP Engineer
    • Jackson, Renfro & Associates (Birmingham, Ala.) – Electrical Engineer
    • LBYD (Birmingham, Ala. office) – Structural Engineer
    • McGiffert and Associates (Tuscaloosa, Ala.) – Civil Engineer and Landscape Architect
    • Gary C. Wyatt (Birmingham, Ala.) – General Contractor


William H. Johnston Building at the Florida State University in Tallahassee by Gould Evans Architects

Friday, October 26th, 2012

Article source: Gould Evans Architects

A sophisticated collage of old and new that reactivates a historic building in the heart of campus, the Johnston Building celebrates its mixed-use program through the dynamic intersection of circulation and transparency.

Particular attention was paid to the execution details in the building to reinforce the distinction between old and new and pay homage to the craftsmanship of the original building. Image credit: Adam Cohen Photography

  • Architects: Gould Evans Architects
  • Project: William H. Johnston Building at the Florida State University
  • Location: Tallahassee, Florida
  • Year: 2011
  • Area: 67,000 square foot renovation and 78,000 square foot addition
  • Owner: The Florida State University/ State University System Board of Governors
  • Construction Manager: Peter R. Brown Construction (Tallahassee, FL)
  • Structural Engineer: Walter P. Moore (Tampa, FL)
  • MEP: H2 Engineering (Tallahassee, FL)
  • Civil/Landscape: George & Associates (Tallahassee, FL)
  • Commissioning: TLC Engineering for Architecture (Tallahassee, FL)
  • Artwork: Rob Ley, Urbana (Beverly Hills, CA)
  • Photograph: Adam Cohen Photography


Schlump ONE in Hamburg, Germany by J. MAYER H. Architects

Thursday, October 25th, 2012

Article source: J. MAYER H. Architects

The project “Schlump ONE” is located directly at the underground station Schlump in Eimsbüttel district in Hamburg. The original administration building from the 1950s and 90s was gutted, renovated and expanded, and has now been converted into an office building with four possible rental units per floor. The existing data processing center in the courtyard has been transformed into a private university and expanded to include a new building. The building’s facade has been completely renovated and redesigned to form a single unit that freely interprets the original building’s 1950s linear design. The organic formal language of the facade is continued in the design of interiors. The project is embedded in a sophisticated, open space planning design with oversized tree sculptures.

Image Courtesy Jan Bitter, Ludger Paffrath

  • Architects: J. MAYER H. Architects
  • Project: Schlump ONE
  • Location: Hamburg, Germany
  • Project Team: Juergen Mayer H., Christoph Emenlauer, Mehrdad Mashaie, Ana Alonso de la Varga
  • Project Architect: Hans Schneider
  • Project: 2010 – 2012
  • Completion: Summer 2012
  • Client: Cogiton, Projekt Eimsbuettel GmbH, Hamburg
  • Architect on Site: Architekturbuero Franke, Hamburg
  • Structural Engineers: WTM Engineers
  • Building Services: Energiehaus Ingenieure, Sineplan, Hamburg
  • Landscape Architects: Breimann Bruun Simons, Hamburg
  • Photographers: Jan Bitter  (,   Ludger Paffrath (
  • Software used: ArchiCAD, Maya


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