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Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal loves modern architecture. He comes from a family of builders who have built more than 20 projects in the last ten years near Delhi in India. He has recently started writing about the architectural projects that catch his imagination.

THE BLOEMENDAAL TOWN HALL in Netherlands by NEXT architects

 
July 19th, 2015 by Sumit Singhal

Article source: NEXT architects

The new Bloemendaal Town Hall opened its doors on 25 June 2015. The realisation of the new town hall is the coping stone of a process set in motion with the ‘uniting’ of the municipalities of Bloemendaal and Bennebroek in January 2009. With these central premises the municipal organisation, which now encompasses the civic centres of Bloemendaal, Overveen, Aerdenhout, Vogelenzang and Bennebroek, has also found its physical expression. One address, one face, one identity.

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

  • Architects: NEXT architects, Rudy Uytenhaak Architectenbureau
  • Project: THE BLOEMENDAAL TOWN HALL
  • Location: Bloemendaal, Netherlands
  • Photography: Dirk Verwoerd
  • Team: Marijn Schenk, Michel Schreinemachers, Bart Reuser met Jurriaan Hillerström, Tara Steenvoorden, Sylvia Hendriks, Arno Kwint, Robbert Bron, Hilda van Gortel, Paulo Borlido (NEXT architects), Rudy Uytenhaak, Tomer Meirom, Saskia Oranje (Rudy Uytenhaak Architectenbureau)
  • Landscape architect: Peter de Ruyter landschapsarchitectuur, Haarlem
  • Floor area:4.500 sqm
  • Completion:2015
  • Cost / Value:€ 7.500.000,00

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

Located at the edge of sand dunes and mire, the landscape architect J.D. Zocher built a country house here in 1820, a white plastered villa in neoclassical style. In 1950 the estate was bought by the Bloemendaal municipality, with the intention of extending the property. This intended extension was never realised however, and in 1966 a new building was finally constructed, incorporating a faithful copy of the facade of the original villa.

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

In 2011 history appears to repeat itself: NEXT and Uytenhaak are given the task of revitalising the existing 1966 town hall, to incorporate sustainability in the design, and to make it suitable for modern working practices. The design process started with the intention of only a limited extension to the building. It envisaged a penthouse above the old building, which was to be entirely gutted internally. This led eventually to the decision to retain the front of the building and the facade, and to construct a new, compact building that is slightly separated from it. The architects managed to realise this new program within the contours of the old building, and to retain its characteristic identity.

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

With this design the history of the country estate can clearly be seen. The original building and the new building are united in a layered fashion; the design represents a dialogue between old and new, between history and the present.

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

A new entrance
The strength of the design is to be found in a number of smart innovations. For example the sand dune landscape has been partly excavated to open up the level where the cellar previously was as the principal public area and Citizens’ Hall. The landscape, designed by landscape architect Peter de Ruyter, flows away downwards and in this way a new entrance has been made on the south side in the gap between the old and the new buildings. Whilst the characteristic front facade retains its function as a ceremonial entrance, the new town hall has been given a new entrance here, on the south side. The park surrounding the town hall blends effortlessly into the undulating character of the dune landscape. A cantilever design conservatory forming part of the council hall is a prominent feature within the East facade and this echoes the neoclassical row of columns on the west facade. Whereas the building was previously primarily orientated towards this west facade, with its characteristic architecture, it has now become a building with four extremely presentable facades.

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

Image Courtesy © Dirk Verwoerd

Image Courtesy © NEXT architects

Image Courtesy © NEXT architects

Image Courtesy © NEXT architects

Image Courtesy © NEXT architects

Image Courtesy © NEXT architects

Image Courtesy © NEXT architects

Image Courtesy © NEXT architects

Image Courtesy © NEXT architects

Image Courtesy © NEXT architects

Image Courtesy © NEXT architects

Image Courtesy © NEXT architects

Image Courtesy © NEXT architects

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