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Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal loves modern architecture. He comes from a family of builders who have built more than 20 projects in the last ten years near Delhi in India. He has recently started writing about the architectural projects that catch his imagination.

Don Bosco Church in Maribor, Slovenia by Dans arhitekti

 
March 1st, 2016 by Sumit Singhal

Article source: Dans arhitekti

The Don Bosco Church is part of a new parish centre, located in a residential quarter of Maribor, under the Pohorje Massif. The site boasts a view towards the Pekrska Gorca Mountain.

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

  • Architects: Dans arhitekti
  • Project: Don Bosco Church
  • Location: Engelsova ulica 66, Maribor, Slovenia
  • Photography: Miran Kambič
  • Client: The Salesians in Slovenia
  • Competition: 2007
  • Project: 2011
  • Built: 2015

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

The Religious Complex belonging to the Salesian community is designed as a closed building island, placed inside a small park, which protects the complex of two nearby roads. The building itself is a clearly articulated rectangular architectural mass with an introverted central courtyard with the nave and the bell tower rising above it.

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Upon entering the contemplative courtyard adorned by an old linden tree the church suddenly becomes visible across the portico. At a glance one can feel the extent of the nave from the ground over the roof of the lower part of the complex all the way to the cornice that represents a crown. The volume of the nave is set into the structure of the lower one story building. Its uniform brick facade is embellished with ornaments representing seven crosses made of glazed bricks.

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

The shape of the nave is derived from a triangle with rounded corners and sides. The nave is the place for introverted contemplation therefore the only view out is towards the sky. The most sacred place is thus marked by an intense experience of light.

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

We used different qualities of light in order to accentuate the hugging shape of the nave. We choreographed a play of light: vivid natural light emitting from the round skylight interferes with diffused light of the nave. More soft natural light is coming from behind the presbytery and the rear choir. This simple yet so complex design allows the building to transcend its physical presence, becoming a mere container of light.

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Pristine non-decorated expression of the structure of the nave is accentuated by plasticity of softly shaped concrete. The oval perimeter of the nave features horizontal lateral recesses, which house the chapel with the tabernacle, entrance to the sacristy, confessionals, side and rear choirs and a place for communion prayers. These openings induce a feeling of peaceful rotation around the central oculus.

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

The church seats 300 people on wooden benches. The floor below is covered massive oak wood floor while 100 handmade clay lamps form the horizon above. Warm materials such as oak wood fittings and clay lamps create a feeling of safe haven for the church community. We also designed all the liturgical equipment, such as the altar, the ambo, the tabernacle, sedilia, benches and layout of the artworks.

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Tabernacle, placed in the side chapel, is a triptych with outer wings veiling the central cabinet. The tabernacle opens in two sequential steps: when the wings are closed, they reveal a floating gold rectangle. Upon opening the two side wings the interior with the mysterious light source – the eternal light – is revealed. The inner tabernacle is adorned with a precious icon – former tabernacle doors from the Basilica of Our Lady Help of Christians, in Turin, which was built by John Bosco.

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Miran Kambič

Image Courtesy © Dans arhitekti

Image Courtesy © Dans arhitekti

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Category: Church

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