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Sanjay Gangal
Sanjay Gangal
Sanjay Gangal is the President of IBSystems, the parent company of AECCafe.com, MCADCafe, EDACafe.Com, GISCafe.Com, and ShareCG.Com.

The Professor’s House in Chapel Hill, North Carolina by Arielle Condoret Schechter

 
September 8th, 2017 by Sanjay Gangal

Article source: Arielle Condoret Schechter

This small, modern house was designed for an eminent author and professor of Native American studies. A widow now, she wanted to downsize from her 3200-square-foot house and live in a new, age-in-place home in a quiet, wooded neighborhood in Chapel Hill, NC, with her dog, Calamity Jane.

Image Courtesy © Keith Isaacs, Raleigh, NC

  • Architects: Arielle Condoret Schechter
  • Project: The Professor’s House
  • Location: Chapel Hill, North Carolina USA
  • Photography: Keith Isaacs, Raleigh, NC
  • Structural Engineer: Brian Moskow, Red Engineering and Design, Apex, NC
  • Contractor: Ted Sanford, Immaculate Construction, Graham, NC
  • Construction cost: $250/square foot
  • Completed: 2017

Image Courtesy © Keith Isaacs, Raleigh, NC

The final design is a little over1600 heated square feet, which is about half the size of her previous house and about 1000 square feet less than the average American house of 2500 square feet.

A smaller house also meant the Professor could afford such special features as a swimming pool and a Japanese Ofuro soaking tub.

Image Courtesy © Keith Isaacs, Raleigh, NC

Image Courtesy © Keith Isaacs, Raleigh, NC

For age-in-place functionality, the house has zero thresholds from the entry bridge outside to the curb-less showers inside. The bridge leading from the guest parking area to the front door also means the Professor’s friends have no steps to maneuver steps upon arriving or leaving. And the one-car garage – with a charging station for her electric car — is on grade so she can walk into her kitchen without climbing a single step.

Image Courtesy © Keith Isaacs, Raleigh, NC

Image Courtesy © Keith Isaacs, Raleigh, NC

The entry bridge also makes the journey from the driveway to the recessed front door an event. Projecting pavilions – the garage at one end, the guest bedroom suite at the other—add depth to the façade. And under the guest wing, where the terrain dips sharply, the recessed foundation makes the house seem to float above the land.

Image Courtesy © Keith Isaacs, Raleigh, NC

Image Courtesy © Keith Isaacs, Raleigh, NC

At the back of the house, a covered terrace with natural wood flooring and a screened porch overlook nearby Morgan Creek. At one end, the master suite opens onto the terrace and the swimming pool. There are no steps down from the house to the covered terrace, the swimming pool level is a few steps lower than the terrace so that it doesn’t dominate the view from the living room, especially in the off-season when it remains covered.

Image Courtesy © Keith Isaacs, Raleigh, NC

Image Courtesy © Keith Isaacs, Raleigh, NC

Cascading flat roofs provide space for clerestory windows and expose the honey-hued plywood roof decking. Along with the clerestories, large, unadorned windows and wide glass doors fill the interior with natural light. In the living area, the glazing provides panoramic views of the terrace and Morgan Creek. Deep roof overhangs protect the glazing from high summer sun.

Image Courtesy © Keith Isaacs, Raleigh, NC

Image Courtesy © Keith Isaacs, Raleigh, NC

Programmatically, the small house includes:
• An ample open living/dining “great room” with a double-sided fireplace that’s open to both the living room and the Professor’s office behind it.
• A small courtyard off the dining area.
• A master bedroom suite with corner windows, a large open shower, and Ofuro soaking tub overlooking the courtyard.
• A guest bedroom and bath with corner windows.
• The third bedroom that she uses as an office.
• A super-efficient workhorse kitchen connected to a mudroom with plenty of storage.
• The one-car garage with charging station.
• Plenty of wall space for displaying the Professor’s Native American art and artifacts.

Image Courtesy © Keith Isaacs, Raleigh, NC

Image Courtesy © Arielle Condoret Schechter

Among the green elements, the house’s roof cavity has R-55 insulation (building code is R-38), a layer of exterior insulation on top of the deck and a layer of continuous insulation on the exterior walls, provided by Huber R-sheathing. The Professor chose a swimming pool over solar panels., yet a small solar array would easily make it net zero in the future.

Image Courtesy © Arielle Condoret Schechter

Image Courtesy © Keith Isaacs, Raleigh, NC

Construction materials include:
• Southern yellow pine framing
• Hardie Panel siding
• SYP porch and terrace roof
• Windows: Marvin contemporary and Integrity lines
• Flooring: Select Hickory
• Bridge: SYP stained
• Railings: welded and woven wire
• Roof: EPDM white cool roof membrane

Image Courtesy © Keith Isaacs, Raleigh, NC

Image Courtesy © Keith Isaacs, Raleigh, NC

Image Courtesy © Keith Isaacs, Raleigh, NC

Image Courtesy © Keith Isaacs, Raleigh, NC

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Categories: House, Residential




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