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Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal loves modern architecture. He comes from a family of builders who have built more than 20 projects in the last ten years near Delhi in India. He has recently started writing about the architectural projects that catch his imagination.

No 86 in Singapore by ROBERT GREG SHAND ARCHITECTS

 
July 12th, 2018 by Sumit Singhal

Article source: ROBERT GREG SHAND ARCHITECTS

The property in Singapore’s Luxury Island Resort of Sentosa Cove is built on a long narrow plot with views to the rear of the Sentosa Golf Course.  The design inspiration for the house was a traditional Japanese courtyard house, with rooms spilling onto terraces that surround a central courtyard garden.  Combined with a holistic approach to sustainability and climactic needs, this contemporary beach house is a refreshing escape for the family that owns it.

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

The courtyard becomes the primary focus of the home and an integral visual element for each room.  This effect is emphasized architecturally by blurring the division between the courtyard and the rooms by extending the 2nd storey ceiling over the courtyard in the form of a trellis, and having materials flow from the exterior into the interior.

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

With no sea views, water was used as the primary element in the courtyard landscape design to reference the seaside location of the house.  A large reflecting pond in the courtyard and the swimming pool at the rear were built to wrap around the house, with shading by a trellis roof that spatially integrates the external courtyard with the surrounding rooms.

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

The front elevation of the house consisted of two blocks clad with groove-cut travertine marble and a large teak picture frame to mark the entrance.  The external marble cladding is brought inside the home, blurring the line between the interior and exterior of the house.

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

The house is spread over two levels with living, dining, kitchen, gym and a guest bedroom on the ground floor, while the second floor has three bedrooms including the master bedroom and study. All bedrooms have attached bathrooms.

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

The Master bedroom has a large dressing area and open concept bathroom with a cantilevered recycled teak vanity with his and hers basins.  LED lighting has been used to highlight the high recycled teak ceiling – the reflected light providing a warm diffuse glow for the room.  The master bedroom links to the study via a covered balcony.

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

By separating the gym and study wing, the idea was to open up the house to get glimpses of the golf course behind, and give the feeling of living in a resort garden oasis rather than a typical house. A suspended staircase set against a feature wall of groove-cut travertine marble links the courtyard with the study and master bedroom balcony.

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

The staircase and entry hall is another focal point of the house with their double height ceiling and bridge leading from the stairs to the bedrooms.

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

The use of travertine marble with a custom groove-cut pattern, juxtaposed with natural recycled teak and stainless steel, portray a feeling of understated luxury.  The groove cuts in the light ivory travertine gives depth to the stone and adds texture to the walls when cast by light.  Burmese teak was specified to compliment the ivory travertine and add a homely warmth to the spaces.  Hairline Stainless Steel is used for accents, and adds a touch of sophistication to the articulation of such elements as the staircase handrail and bridge to the bedroom wing.

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

Passive Sustainable Design was incorporated through the large canopies, trellises and roof overhangs to naturally shade the rooms and keep them cool. The trellis roof also shades the courtyard pond and filters solar radiation. The rooms’ full height doors (designed to conceal locks and handles) fully slide away to open up to the courtyard, providing ample cross ventilation. The result is a home that is bright, airy and exudes a Zen calmness.

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

Image Courtesy © Aaron Pocock Photography

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Categories: Courtyard, Garden, Hall, House, Residential, Swimming Pool, Terrace

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