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Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal
Sumit Singhal loves modern architecture. He comes from a family of builders who have built more than 20 projects in the last ten years near Delhi in India. He has recently started writing about the architectural projects that catch his imagination.

Extension of Gösta Museum in Serlachius, Finland by Dellekamp Arquitectos + Periférica

 
August 27th, 2011 by Sumit Singhal

Article source: Dellekamp Arquitectos + Periférica

A line is a dot that went for a walk –Paul Klee

The project preserves the historical value and prominence of the original building by smoothly integrating it to the new museum. The new museum is a linear sequence of buildings scaled to the original building. Its thread of volumes not only has a light footprint but also confers an interweaving rhythm to its linear promenade. The space divisions functionally conform to all aspects comprised in the program. Interior and exterior, empty space and exhibit space, nature and building are connected through a series of passages, ramps and crossovers. The interiors offer interesting views and spatial experiences by playing on heights and light.

Rendering (Images Courtesy Daniel Carlson)

  • Architect: Dellekamp Arquitectos + Periférica
  • Name of Project: Extension of Gösta Museum
  • Location: Serlachius, Finland
  • Status: International competition
  • Project Leader: Derek Dellekamp + Rozana Montiel|Periférica
  • Models + Photos: Daniel Carlson

Rendering of Site Plan (Images Courtesy Daniel Carlson)

  • Team: Jachen Schleich, Alin Wallach, Emiel Tijhuis, Daniel Carlson, Simon Willett, Kris Kornovich, Jorge Najera, Armando Bussey
  • Renders: Carlos Zimbrón
  • Usable floor area: 3.994 m2
  • Gross floor area: 6.151 m2
  • Net area: 5.436 m2

Foyer (Images Courtesy Daniel Carlson)

The skylights use light diffusers that take into account insulation and energetic resource preservation.  The ends of the museum stretching out into the water shores integrate the experience of nature to the exhibit space.  The façade uses shou-sugi-ban cedar woodwork at the front and back, and brick on the sides. The natural materials gently integrate the building to the landscape and the historical building: its vertical woodwork patterns in resonance with the forest as well as with the wood-milling history of the site; its horizontal brick layout in unison with the original house. The sight plan involves a series of decks outlining the shores intended for additional promenade trails. The peninsula connects to the island by a bridge topped with a lookout. The island also provides a circular deck plan for land-art sculpture promenades and offers a sauna experience at its core.

Galeria (Images Courtesy Daniel Carlson)

The project preserves the historical value and prominence of the original building by smoothly integrating it to the new museum. The new museum is a linear sequence of buildings scaled to the original building. Its thread of volumes not only has a light footprint but also confers an interweaving rhythm to its linear promenade. The space divisions functionally conform to all aspects comprised in the program. Interior and exterior, empty space and exhibit space, nature and building are connected through a series of passages, ramps and crossovers. The interiors offer interesting views and spatial experiences by playing on heights and light. The ends of the museum stretching out into the water shores integrate the experience of nature to the exhibit space. The peninsula connects to the island by a bridge topped with a lookout. The island also provides a circular deck plan for land-art sculpture promenades and offers a sauna experience at its core.

Rendering (Images Courtesy Daniel Carlson)

A line is a dot going for a walk

EPICENTER

  • The new museum detonates an expansive experience of the original building.
  • The historical building is the resonance epicenter for the new museum.
  • The new building stretches out connecting water across the peninsula.
  • The line confers even hierarchy to the old and the new.

Model

LANDMARK

  • The line has the lightest possible footprint.
  • The new museum is scaled to the original building.
  • The new building becomes a balance scale suspended on the land’s axis.
  • The line draws no attention to itself while drawing out a landscape.

INTEGRATION

  • The line is discrete: it interweaves building with nature.
  • The new museum is democratic: it brings the mill into the house; it takes the villa to the paper mill.
  • The new building is a modern take on a historical statement: it is an exclusive space that belongs to everyone.
  • The line gives presence to the historical building: it incorporates old and new through the original’s scale.

 

Plan 01

CONNECTION

  • The sequence of buildings confer rhythm: they allow thresholds, passages and crossovers within a linear promenade.
  • The trajectory creates continuity between interior and exterior.
  • The line is inclusive: the historical building resonates in the parts.
  • The new museum encompasses both program and landscape through a thread of volumes.

 

Plan 02

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Category: Museum

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