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100banch in Tokyo, Japan by Jo Nagasaka/Schemata Architects

Tuesday, October 3rd, 2017

Article source: Jo Nagasaka/Schemata Architects

In celebration of the 100th anniversary of Panasonic Corporation, 100 BANCH was established as an innovative work platform where Panasonic works in collaboration with future generations to create new values that will help shaping the next 100 years. The first floor is a cafe space “KITCHEN” organized and run by Cafe Company; the second floor is a work space “GARAGE” for project members who are concurrently developing multiple projects; the third floor is a collaborative space “LOFT” for creation of new values for the next 100 years. Schemata Architects was responsible for the overall exterior design and interior design of the second and third floors. “GARAGE” on the second floor has a very low ceiling height of 2015 mm, but we decided to make the best use of the low, hand-reachable ceiling to bring out the unique potential of the space that would be used as the creative platform intended to imagine the next 100 years. We designed a ceiling-mounted lighting and power supply socket using the “duplex lamp socket”, which is an iconic product invented by Konosuke Matsushita, the founder of Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. Ltd. (the former company name of Panasonic), and installed the sockets at 750-mm intervals on the ceiling; they can be directly and easily attached/detached by hand so that users can arrange the work space flexibly on their own and use light and power at any location. In order to extend such freedom of movement vertically as well as horizontally, automatic height adjustable tables are adopted, allowing people to stand and sit freely and consequently creating a highly flexible expandable work place where they can work or hold meetings anywhere.

Image Courtesy © Jo Nagasaka/Schemata Architects

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Shichu no Sankyo in Tokyo, Japan by Fumihiko Sano Studio

Thursday, September 28th, 2017

Article source: Fumihiko Sano Studio 

LIFE SPACE UX is a SONY’s new brand born with a concept to fit in daily life. I designed a space to showcase its series of products.

I picked the idea of “Shichu no sankyo” in Japanese tea ceremony terms as a theme of this project, this is the idea of a country cottage built in the middle of a modern metropolis and also suggests another dimension therefore I built a modern Japanese space in the center of Ginza, Tokyo.

Image Courtesy © Koichiro Kutsuna

  • Architects: Fumihiko Sano Studio (studio PHENOMENON)
  • Project: Shichu no Sankyo
  • Location: 5-5-3-1 Ginza,Chuo-ku,Tokyo,104-0061,Japan
  • Photography: Koichiro Kutsuna
  • Client: SONY
  • Construction: GARA / Michikusa
  • Produce: The Tea Room
  • Site area: 90.52 m²
  • Completion: 10/2016

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Délirium Café in Tokyo, Japan by Doyle Collection

Tuesday, September 26th, 2017

Article source: Doyle Collection

Délirium Café opened at Ginza Tokyo, off the main street where many attractive small restaurants stand side by side along the off-street. It has a narrow entrance with the width of 3 meters. Whereas it is a unique shaped café with the depth of 30 meters long. To make an effective use of this shape, we divided the area into three sections. Every section has their original characteristics.

Image Courtesy © Satoru Umetsu And Nacasa&Partners

  • Architects: Doyle Collection
  • Project: Délirium Café
  • Location: 5-9-5, Ginza, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, Japan
  • Photography: Satoru Umetsu And Nacasa&Partners
  • Client: Ever Brew Co,.Ltd.
  • Designer: Aiji Inoue, Masaru Kobayashi
  • Area: 146.7 sqm
  • Open: 1st, May, 2015

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Max&Co Building in Omotesando, Tokyo by Andrea Tognon Architecture

Monday, September 25th, 2017

Article source: Andrea Tognon Architecture

In 2013 Andrea Tognon Architecture has been commissioned by Max Mara fashion group to design a new building for Japanese Max&Co headquarter in Omotesando Tokyo. The result is a 30 meter tower built around a central cipollino marble column which supports the entire building. Five thick curved concrete slab divide the building in six floors. All the services disappear in a dark background that host a golden staircase claiming the building till a pergola that overview the entire city.

Image Courtesy © Andrea Tognon

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House for 4 Generations in Tokyo, Japan by tomomi kito architect & associates

Sunday, July 23rd, 2017

Article source: tomomi kito architect & associates 

This is an interior renovation project of an existing two-story timber structure house in Tokyo built approximately 40 years ago.

The client is a young couple, and the wife’s parents were living there before the renovation. The client decided to live with their parents in this house. Soon after, the wife’s grandmother who lives alone in the countryside – far from Tokyo – also decided to live together in this house. As such, the client requested to renovate the house suitable for accommodating 4 generations – the grandmother (1st generation), parents (2nd generation), the client (3rd generation), the client’s son (4th generation).

Image Courtesy © satoshi shigeta

  • Architects: tomomi kito architect & associates (Tomomi Kito)
  • Project: House for 4 Generations
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • Photography: satoshi shigeta
  • Software used: Vectorworks, Autocad
  • Structural designer: Building Structure Institute
  • Technical advisor: Yutaka Misawa
  • Lighting advisor: Kanae Hagiwara
  • Completion: April 2017

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Musashino-kan Shinjuku Cinema Theater in Tokyo, Japan by Key Operation, Inc.

Tuesday, July 11th, 2017

Article source: Key Operation, Inc.

Naito Shinjuku was established in 1699 as a stage stop along a major thoroughfare heading out of Edo (old name of Tokyo). Dropping the “Naito,” the district started to be called Shinjuku in 1920, the same year that saw the Musashino-kan Shinjuku emerge on Shinjuku-dori Avenue, which was also home to the Shinjuku Mitsukoshi store. Local merchants opened a 600-seat movie theater in the three-story wooden structure with tiled façades. In 1928, Musashino-kan Shinjuku relocated to its current site, a new cinema with 1,115 seats housed in a three-story concrete building. During the silent movie era, Musei Tokugawa was active as a narrator here. Later, an air raid over Tokyo caused a fire to burn the entire interior of the theater, but the building survived and became a symbol of post-war recovery. Cinema offered entertainment to the populace, and Musashino-kan entered the golden age in an alliance of more than 20 theaters. But the movie-going population peaked in 1958 at 1.1 billion tickets, and rapidly dropped to 1/3 of that patronage by 1965. Amidst a declining industry, the decrepit Musashino-kan was demolished in 1966 and rebuilt. Still standing today, the building initially consisted of a retail and dining complex seven floors aboveground and three floors underground. The first movie theater in this new building had 500 seats on the seventh floor. In 1994, the Cinema Qualite mini-theater opened. The seventh floor was closed in 2002, and the third-floor theater operations changed banners from Cinema Qualite to Musashino-kan Shinjuku. For the improvements made most recently, however, aseismic reinforcement work on the entire building prompted the Musashino-kan Shinjuku on the third floor to undergo a complete renovation.

Image Courtesy © Nacasa & Partners, Inc.

  • Architects: Key Operation, Inc. (Akira Koyama)
  • Project: Musashino-kan Shinjuku Cinema Theater
  • Location: Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
  • Photography: Nacasa & Partners, Inc.
  • Software used: Autocad, Illustrator, Photoshop
  • Client ∕ Developer: Musashino Kogyo Co. ,Ltd
  • Quantity Survayor: GEN Architectural Management
  • Construction: Toei Kenko, Hazama Ando Corp.
  • Gross Floor Area: 770.44 m2
  • Lease Area: 879.48 m2
  • Completion: November 2016

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TRIM in Tokyo, Japan by Satoshi Kurosaki / APOLLO Architects & Associates

Wednesday, June 28th, 2017

Article source: Satoshi Kurosaki / APOLLO Architects & Associates 

After inheriting the house that his father had built, the client originally considered tearing it down and rebuilding. However, the thirty-some-year-old building had an authentic beauty to it, and its reinforced concrete structure was sound, so he decided to work with the existing framework. The renovation focused on interiors and appliances, while the exterior was left nearly untouched aside from the approach, windows, and doors.

Image Courtesy © Masao Nishikawa

  • Architects: Satoshi Kurosaki / APOLLO Architects & Associates
  • Project: TRIM
  • Location: Ohta ward, Tokyo, Japan
  • Photography: Masao Nishikawa
  • Mechanical Engineer: Naoki Matsumoto
  • Lighting design: SIRIUS LIGHTING OFFICE
  • Structure: Reinforced-concrete
  • Site Area: 268.39m2
  • Total Floor Area: 194.44m2
  • Design Period: October2014 – December2016

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HDI Tokyo Office in Japan by van der Architects

Friday, June 9th, 2017

Article source: van der Architects 

What does an authentic workplace look like? Designing an authentic office is not an easy task. Just like the terms “artist”, “poet” or “great lover”, these are titles that are given or need to be earned rather than being self-assigned.

Our attempt in creating an authentic workplace started off with our WorkVitamins methodology. This methodology was created by me, Martin van der Linden, principal of van der Architects, when I was an assistant researcher at Waseda Univeristy in 2001 here in Tokyo. I believes that architecture can be a catalyst for change in innovative environments, and this methodology – called “WorkVitamins” – is based on this idea.

Image Courtesy © Yo Masunaga

  • Architects: van der Architects (Martin van der Linden)
  • Project: HDI Tokyo Office
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • Photography: Yo Masunaga
  • Software used: Vectorworks, SketchUp
  • Client: HDI
  • Project team: Ayumu Ota, Yuko Kawakita
  • Contractor: SPD Meiji

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COOOP3 in Tokyo, Japan by Domino Architects

Thursday, April 20th, 2017

Article source: Domino Architects

We designed a new office space for a creative agency in Tokyo applying mixture of technology and traditional Japanese wood works for structure, furniture and fixtures. To keep the flexibility of the space, we suggested a portable partition system to insert on the floor and create proper size of the area.

The floor includes lab space intended for long-term project and war room intended for many projects to have short, intensive period of discussions. Each space is divided by glass partitions so that each active project can feel each other and is visible at a glance.

Image Courtesy © Gottingham

  • Architects: Domino Architects
  • Project: COOOP3
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • Photography: Gottingham
  • Clients: Loftwork Inc.
  • Lead Architects: Yusuke Oono
  • Contractor: Eckits
  • Woodwork consultants: Hidakuma
  • Gross Built Area (square meters or square foot): 218.2 sqm
  • Completion Year: 2017

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Ginza Place in Tokyo, Japan by Klein Dytham architecture (KDa)

Thursday, April 13th, 2017

Article source: Klein Dytham architecture (KDa) 

Ginza Place, a major commercial development in Tokyo’s famous Ginza shopping district, occupies arguably the most prominent recent development site in Japan. Ginza’s reputation for elegance and sophistication has made it a center of Japanese culture and commerce for more than a century. Ginza Place completes the neighborhood’s central intersection by introducing a bold and well calculated facade to the streetscape.

Image Courtesy © Klein Dytham architecture (KDa)

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